Jun 24, 2024  
2021-2022 University of Wyoming Catalog 
    
2021-2022 University of Wyoming Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

College of Education


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6 Education

Scott Thomas, John P. “Jack” Ellbogen Dean

Andrea C. Burrows: Associate Dean for Undergraduate Programs

Jenna M. Shim: Associate Dean for Graduate Programs


Building Phone: (307)766-3145 FAX: (307)766-6668
Web site: www.uwyo.edu/education

The College of Education prepares teachers, counselors, administrators and other service personnel for positions in public education in Wyoming, throughout the nation, and the world. The teacher education program incorporates content area courses from the various colleges on campus with experiences in educational methodology. Programs are designed to provide students with a maximum amount of experience in the classroom.

Graduates of the College of Education are prepared to deal with youth growing up in a rapidly changing world. Programs are experiential, collaborative, outcomes based, and technologically supported. Emphasis is placed on professional ethics, a commitment to lifelong learning, and respect for all individuals in our culturally diverse society.

Programs of Study

Undergraduate Degrees

Bachelor of Science

Agricultural education

Bachelor of Applied Science

           Career and Technical education              

Bachelor of Arts

Elementary education

Elementary/Special education

Secondary education

Graduate Degrees

Master of Science
Master of Science in Counseling
Master of Arts
Doctor of Philosophy
Doctor of Education
Doctor of Counselor Education and Supervision

Accreditation

The College of Education, a member of the American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education, is currently accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP) and is moving toward the Association for Advancing Quality in Educator Preparation (AAQEP) in 2023-2024. The Wyoming Professional Teaching Standards Board (PTSB) and the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools approve the college as an accredited teacher-preparing institution. The Counseling programs are fully accredited by the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP).

Organization of the College

The College of Education includes undergraduate teacher education and graduate studies in education. Schools offering undergraduate and graduate programs in the college include Teacher Education and Counseling, Leadership, Advocacy, and Design.

Undergraduate and graduate education are supported by several units. The Teacher Preparation and Advising Office, McWhinnie Hall room 100, coordinates activities dealing with academic advising, field experiences, and teacher licensure.

The Wellspring Counseling Clinic provides counseling services to students, staff, faculty of the university, as well as the community at-large.

The College of Education, College of Arts and Sciences, Wyoming community colleges, many Wyoming districts, the Wyoming Professional Teaching Standards Board, and the Wyoming Department of Education are part of the Wyoming School-University Partnership, which grounds collaborative efforts across the state related to K-12 preservice and inservice education.

The Laboratory School, an Albany County School District entity, serves the college, the university, the school district, and the state as an educational center for research, development, instructional advancement, and inservice education. The school enrolls students in pre-school through eighth grade.

Computer laboratories in the college feature a wide range of capabilities including Internet access. The laboratory equipment is frequently updated to serve the needs of students, faculty and staff.

The Learning Resource Center is a branch of the university library system. Educational materials are available to serve the needs of K-12 students, university students, university faculty and public school faculty in Wyoming

B.A. and B.S. degrees in the College of Education are housed in the School of Teacher Education and consist of increasingly demanding phases of professional preparation. Competencies based on professional standards, including those mandated by the Wyoming Professional Teaching Standards Board (PTSB), are addressed developmentally. A teacher candidate graduating from this program will have mastered competencies required by the PTSB and the education profession.

Freshman year (Preprofessional): Students concentrate on the University Studies Program requirements. EDST 2450 - Foundations of Development and Learning , must be completed prior to moving on.

All incoming students pursuing teacher certification and/or teacher endorsement pro­grams must undergo an initial criminal back­ground check prior to full admission to the teacher education program. A second background check is included as part of the state application process for the Wyoming Substitute Teaching Permit, which is required for continuation in the B.A. and B.S. programs.

Sophomore students are introduced to teaching and learning through EDST 3480 - Diversity & the Politics of Schooling  . This course includes a field experience in a public school setting.

A junior-level experience extends student competence through EDST 3100 - Teacher as Practitioner . The practicum experience is in a public school guided by practicing K-12 faculty.

A two-semester sequence in the final year consists of pedagogy course work and fieldwork in the first semester. The second semester consists of a 16-week, fulltime classroom experience. Field experiences are completed in districts that are members of the Wyoming School-University Partnership.

Graduate certificate teacher licensure program students must have a cumulative GPA of 2.750 or higher from UW or from another accredited college or university, in order to declare a major in Education. A valid Wyoming Substitute Teaching Permit will be required, which will also serve as an approved background check.

Teacher education programs in Music, Art, Physical Education and Health are offered in other colleges at UW.

Faculty in the College of Education

School of Counseling, Leadership, Advocacy, and Design

School Director: Peter Moran

Associate Professors:

KARA L. CARNES-HOLT, B.A. East Texas Baptist University 2000; M.S. Ed. Baylor University 2003; Ph.D. University of North Texas 2010; Associate Professor of Counselor Education 2016, 2010.

COURTNEY McKIM, B.S. Boise State University 2006; Ph.D. University of Nebraska 2011; Associate Professor of Educational Research 2020, 2011.

MICHAEL M. MORGAN, B.S. Brigham Young University 1993; M.S. Auburn University 1995; Ph.D. Purdue University 2003; Associate Professor of Counselor Education 2011, 2003.

LINDSEY NICHOLS, B.S. University of Connecticut 2002; M.A. University of Connecticut 2003; M.Ed. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 2006; Ph.D. Pennsylvania State University 2012; Associate Professor 2019.

W. REED SCULL, B.S. St. Louis University 1983; M.A. University of Nevada-Reno 1989; Ed.D. University of Arizona 1994; Associate Professor 2019.

Assistant Professors:

WILLIAM CAIN, B.A. University of Texas 1994; Ph.D. Michigan State University 2018; Assistant Professor 2018.

JONTHAN CARRIER, B.S. East Tennessee State University 1999;  M.S.E. Portland State University 2002;  Ph.D. University of the Cumberlands 2017;  Assistant Professor of Higher Education Administration, 2020.

RICHARD CARTER, B.S. Western Carolina University 2010; M.S.E. 2012; Ph.D. University of Kansas 2016; Assistant Professor of Special Education 2017.

AMANDA DeDIEGO, B.S. University of North Georgia 2009; M.S. 2012; Ph.D. University of Tennessee 2016; Assistant Professor of Counselor Education 2016.

BARBARA HICKMAN, B.A. University of Minnesota 1985; B.S. University of Minnesota 1986; M.A. Saint Mary’s College 1997; Ed.D. Northern Arizona University 2017; Assistant Professor 2019.

JIHYUN LEE, B.A. Daegu University 2006; M.Ed. Korea National University 2012; M.S. University of Wisconsin-Madison 2014; Ph.D. University of Texas-Austin 2018; Assistant Professor 2019.

ROBERT MADDOX, B.S Missouri State University 2005; M.A. Southeast Missouri State University 2009; Ed.S. Southeast Missouri State University 2011; Ph.D. University of Wyoming 2015; Assistant Professor 2019.

LAY-NAH BLUE MORRIS-HOWE, B.S. University of Wyoming 2004; M.S. 2007; Ph.D. 2011; Assistant Professor of Counselor Education 2015.

MARK PERKINS, B.A. Ft. Lewis College 2001;  M.A. University of Colorado-Denver 2009;  Ph.D. Colorado State University 2014;  Assistant Professor of Educational Research, 2020.

MIA WILLIAMS, B.S. Northern Arizona University 1995; M.Ed., 1999  Ph.D 2008 Arizona State University Assistant Professor 2020. 

Associate Professional Lecturer:

TIFFANY HUNT, B.S. University of Wyoming 2001; M.S. University of Northern Colorado 2006, Ph.D. 2017; Assistant Professional Lecturer of Special Education 2014.

Professors Emeritus

Martin Agran, Mary Alice Bruce, John Cochenour, Ace Cossairt, Kay Cowie, Michael Day, Deborah McGriff, Alan Moore, Kay Persichitte, Suzanne Young.

School of Teacher Education

School Director: Alan Buss

Professors:

STEVEN M. BIALOSTOK, B.A. University of the Pacific 1975; M.S.W. California State University - Sacramento 1986; Ph.D. University of Arizona 1999; Professor of Elementary and Early Childhood Education 2015, 2000.

CYNTHIA BROCK, B.S. Oregon State University 1981; MGd Washington State University 1985; Ph.D. Michigan State University 1997; Wyoming Excellence in Education Literacy Chair 2015.

ANDREA C. BURROWS, B.S. University of Central Florida 1992; M.S. Florida State University 1994; Ed.D. University of Cincinnati 2011; Professor of Secondary Education 2017, 2011. Associate Dean of Undergraduate Programs 2020.

ALAN R. BUSS, B.A. Brigham Young University 1989; M.A. 1993; Ph.D. University of Wyoming 1998; Professor of Elementary and Early Childhood Education 2019, 1997.

SCOTT A. CHAMBERLIN, B.A. Purdue University 1989 and 1993; M.Ed. University of Utah 1998; Ph.D. Purdue University 2002; Professor of Elementary and Early Childhood Education 2015, 2003.

LEIGH HALL, B.S. University of South Florida 1996; M.Ed. Peabody College of Vanderbilt University 1997; Ph.D. Michigan State University 2005; Professor of Secondary Education 2017. Wyomihg Excellence in Education Literacy Chair, 2017.

JOHN KAMBUTU, B. A. University of Wyoming 1991; M. A. 1992; Ph.D. 1998; Professor of Educational Studies 2015, 1999. 

RICHARD KITCHEN, B.A. University of Colorado-Denver 1984; M.A. University of Montana 1990; Ph.D. University of Wisconsin- Madison 1996; Professor of Secondary Education 2017.  Wyoming Excellence in Education Mathematics Education Chair 2017.

PETER WILLIAM MORAN, B.A. University of Wyoming 1987; M.A. Kansas State University 1993; Ph.D. 2000; Professor of Elementary and Early Childhood Education 2017, 2001.

LYDIAH NGANGA, B.S. University of Wyoming 1998; M.S. 2000; Ph.D. 2005; Professor of Elementary and Early Childhood Education 2020, 2005.

LESLIE S. RUSH, B.S. Texas A&M-Commerce 1984; M.Ed. 1996; Ph.D. University of Georgia, 2002; Professor of Secondary Education 2014, 2002.  

JENNA M. SHIM, B.A. California State University - Los Angeles 1994; M.M. Manhattan School of Music - New York 1996; M.S. State University of New York - Albany 2006; Ph.D. 2009; Professor of Educational Studies 2016, 2010.

TIMOTHY F. SLATER, B.S. Kansas State University 1989; B.S. Ed. 1989; M.S. Clemson University 1991; Ph.D. University of South Carolina 1993; Professor of Secondary Education 2008.  Wyoming Excellence in Education Science Education Chair 2008.  

ALLEN TRENT, B.A. Eastern Kentucky University 1986; M.S. University of Dayton 1992; Ph.D. The Ohio State University 2000; Professor of Elementary and Early Childhood Education 2012.

Associate Professors:

TAO HAN, B.A. Sungshin Women’s University, Korea 1984; M.A. University of Arizona 1993; M.A. University of Nevada-Reno 2002; Ph.D. 2006; Associate Professor of Elementary and Early Childhood Education 2016, 2010.

ANA HOUSEAL, B.A. University of Iowa 1985; M.A. University of Northern Iowa 1998; Ph.D. University of Illinois 2010; Associate Professor of Elementary and Early Childhood Education 2017, 2011.

LINDA HUTCHISON, B.A. Humboldt State University 1978; M.A. Stanford University 1986; Ph.D. University of Washington 1992; Associate Professor of Secondary Education 2000, 1993.

TRICIA JOHNSON, B.S. Lehigh University 1991; M.Ed. 1993; Ed.S. George Washington University 1997; Ed.D. Columbia University 2004; Associate Professor of Elementary and Early Childhood Education 2012.

PATRICK MANYAK, B.A. Pepperdine University 1988; M.S. 1990; Ph.D. University of Southern California-Los Angeles 2001; Associate Professor of Elementary and Early Childhood Education 2007, 2001.

AMY ROBERTS, B.S. Indiana University 1986; M.A. Portland State University 1991; Ph.D. Indiana University 1996; Associate Professor of Elementary and Early Childhood Education 2004, 1998.

KATHERINE MUIR WELSH, B.A. University of California-Berkeley 1986; Single Subject Teaching Credential (Life Sciences) University of California-Santa Barbara 1990; Ph.D. University of California-Los Angeles 2002; Associate Professor of Elementary and Early Childhood Education 2008, 2002.

Assistant Professors:

ALI BICER, B.S. Celal Bayar University 2006; M.S. Texas A&M University 2012; Ph.D. 2016; Assistant Professor of Elementary and Early Childhood Education 2019.

TODD REYNOLDS, B.A. University of Northern Colorado 1998; M.A. 2004; Ed.S. 2008; Ph.D. University of Wyoming 2015; Assistant Professor of Secondary Education 2019.

ALISON MERCIER,  B.S. North Carolina State University 2000; M.S. University of North Carolina 2020; Assistant Professor of Secondary Education 2020. 

Senior Lecturers:

NIKKI BALDWIN, B.A. University of Wyoming 1994; M.A. 2005; Senior Lecturer of Elementary and Early Childhood Education 2020, 2009.

KIMBERLY GUSTAFSON, B.A. University of Wyoming 1998; M.A. 2003; Ed.D. 2010; Senior Lecturer of Elementary and Early Childhood Education 2019, 2007.

AMY SPIKER, B.A. University of Wyoming 1989; M.A. 2004; Senior Lecturer of Elementary and Early Childhood Education 2016, 2007.

Associate Lecturers:

JASON KATZMANN, B.S. Texas Women’s University 1994; M.A. Colorado College 2000; Ph.D. University of Northern Colorado 2007; Assistant Professor of Educational Studies 2016, 2007.

ROD THOMPSON, B.A. University of Nebraska at Kearney 1991; M.A. University of Northern Iowa 1998; Associate Lecturer of Educational Studies 2019.

Assistant Lecturers:

LINDSEY FREEMAN, B.S. University of Wyoming 2011; M.A. 2018; Assistant Lecturer of Educational Studies 2019.

JENNIFER GERINGER, B.A. University of Texas - San Antonio 1991; M.S. University of Wyoming 1997; Ph.D. 2001; Assistant Lecturer of Elementary and Early Childhood Education 2015.

JANET LEAR, B.S. Univerity of Wisconsin-Madison 1990; M.A. University of California, Berkeley 1998; Ph.D. University of Denver 2017; Assistant Lecturer of Educational Studies 2019.

ROCHELLE MCCOY, B.A. Western Governors University 2006; M.A. 2012; Assistant Lecturer of Elementary and Early Childhood Education 2019.

JOSEPH SCHROER, B.A. University of Cincinnati 2002; B.S. 2005; M.A. 2001; Ph.D. 2007; Assistant Lecturer of Educational Studies 2019.

Professors Emeritus:

Michelle Buchanan, Barbara A. Chatton, Margaret Cooney, Lydia Dambekalns, Judith Z. Ellsworth, Patricia McClurg, R. Timothy Rush

Admission to the B.A. and B.S. Programs in the College of Education

New first-time students who meet the University of Wyoming’s standards for admission may declare their major in Elementary Education, Secondary Education in a specific content area, or Education Undecided (EDUD), provided that they have a minimum ACT Composite score of 21 and an ACT Math score of 21 or a minimum new SAT combined score of 1060 with a minimum SAT Math score of 530. A lower ACT/SAT Math score can be replaced by a Math Placement Examination (MPE) score of 2 or higher. Education Undecided majors should decide on a specific content area no later than the first semester of their sophomore year.

All incoming students pursuing teacher certification and/or teacher endorsement programs must undergo an initial criminal background check prior to full admission to the College of Education. A second background check is included as part of the state application process for the Wyoming Substitute Teaching Permit, which is required for continuation in the B.A. and B.S. programs.

For those students who do not meet the above admissions requirements, it is suggested that they major in exploratory studies (EXPL) so that they will receive more appropriate advising and access to support services through Advising, Career and Exploratory Studies until they have attained a minimum 2.750 UW grade point average (with at least 15 UW credits), and successfully complete an approved background check.

Current UW students who wish to change their major to Education but do not yet have a UW grade point average must wait until they meet the requirement of a minimum 2.750 UW grade point average, with at least 15 UW credits posted to their transcript. It is recommended that they complete a Program Change form and contact the Teacher Preparation and Advising Office in McWhinnie Hall, room 100 to initiate the background check process. Students’ progression through the Education curriculum could be delayed until all requirements are fulfilled and their major officially changed to Education.

Transfer students from out of state institutions, as well as from Wyoming community colleges wishing to declare a major in Education must have completed a minimum of 15 transferable credits. Transfer students must have a minimum Transfer GPA of at least 2.750 and successfully complete an approved background check.

For transfer students not meeting these requirements, it is suggested that they major in exploratory studies (EXPL) so that they will receive more appropriate advising and access to support services through Advising, Career and Exploratory Studies until they meet requirement of a minimum 2.750 UW grade point average (with at least 15 UW credits), and successfully complete an approved background check.

Re-admitted students who return to UW after two or more semesters away, and wish to (re-)declare a major in Education, must have a minimum 2.750 UW GPA (with at least 15 UW credits) to do so and successfully complete an approved background check.

Academic Advising

Students are assigned an academic adviser who will assist in planning a program combining University Studies requirements, core content requirements, and professional education courses. Students are expected to consult with their adviser regularly. The Teacher Preparation and Advising Office coordinates advising and provides students and faculty with assistance in areas related to academic advising.

Degree Program Curricula

The following curricula summarize the programs offered by the College of Education. Students complete content courses in their major as well as professional education courses, some of which can also be counted toward their University Studies Program requirements. The University Studies Program requirements include:

  • Communication I (COM1) Credits: 3
  • Communication II (COM2) Credits: 3
  • Communication III (COM3) Credits: 3
  • First-Year Seminar (FYS) Credits: 3
  • Human Culture (H) Credits: 6
  • Physical and Natural World (PN) Credits: 6
  • Quantitative Reasoning (Q) Credits: 3
  • U.S. & Wyoming Constitutions (V) Credits: 3

The minimum total credit hours required to complete a degree in Education is 120. Of the minimum credit hours required to complete a program, 42 credit hours must be completed at the upper division level (3000-level or higher), with 30 of those credits being completed at UW. Additional College of Education requirements are:

  1. 2.750 UW Total Institution grade point average
  2. 2.500 grade point average in the content courses required for each specific major
  3. A valid Wyoming substitute teaching certificate

Further information on each program is available in:

Teacher Preparation and Advising Office
McWhinnie Hall room 100
Dept. 3374, 1000 E. University Ave.
Laramie, WY 82071
(307) 766-2230

Acceptability of Coursework

Courses taken to satisfy professional education requirements and major content requirements must be taken for a conventional grade (A-F) unless offered for S/U grading only.

Professional education courses taken prior to the last 10 years will not be accepted in a degree and/or teacher certification program. The College of Education does not accept transfer credits for Professional Education or content area courses with equivalents at UW when the grade earned was less than a C. Please note that grades of C- will not satisfy this requirement.

The College of Education does not accept either teaching methodology or student teaching coursework or credits completed at other colleges or universities.

Student Responsibility

College of Education students are responsible for knowing and meeting graduation requirements. Students are expected to maintain a 2.750 UW Total Institution grade point average to continue in the professional education sequence and to graduate. Prior to enrolling in professional education courses, students are expected to have met the specific program and course prerequisites as listed in this publication. Students are expected to make reasonable academic progress toward completion of a degree.

Teaching Endorsements

A teaching endorsement is not a standalone teacher certification program. Endorsements are issued by the Wyoming Professional Teaching Standards Board (PTSB) to state-licensed Elementary (K-6) and Secondary (6-12) teachers qualified to teach in specific subject areas, in addition to their initial certification(s).

Endorsements to Teach Additional Science Subjects

By state statute, the University of Wyoming’s College of Education is allowed to provide institutional recommendations for add-on endorsements in Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, and Physics to those who have completed programs leading to licensure in secondary-level Science content areas.

Graduate Study

The two schools of the College of Education provide support for master’s and doctoral degree programs as well as graduate certificates. Faculty and staff work to deliver these programs by providing campus-based courses, courses taught through video conferencing, courses taught on-site at different locations in Wyoming, courses taught online, and courses taught in hybrid formats.

The College of Education is dedicated to offering high quality graduate programs that will provide students with the necessary skills to become educational leaders within their areas of specialization and expertise. All graduate students in the College of Education are expected to become scholars, researchers, and practitioners. They must, therefore, be knowledgeable about the ever-changing literature and research in education, the characteristics and needs of learners, and methods for facilitating learning. They must also understand the process of change and how to facilitate changes in learning settings that reflect what is known about the teaching/learning process. These skills are important to all graduate students, regardless of their areas of specialization or major emphasis.

Degree Programs

College of Education programs fall under one of the following university approved graduate degree titles:

Master of Arts
Master of Science
Master of Science in Counseling
Doctor of Education (Ed.D)
Ph.D. in Education
Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Supervision
Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction

Master’s Programs

There are three master’s programs in the College of Education and two of the three have additional specialization areas. They are designed to provide advanced study for educational professionals. Consult each school (School of Teacher Education  and School of Counseling, Leadership, Advocacy, and Design  ) for program requirements and expectations.

Doctoral Programs

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

The College of Education Ed.D. program prepares students for scholarly inquiry and professional leadership in education. The program consists of (1) applied research, (2) courses and professional experiences in education and related fields designed to develop a comprehensive academic basis for leadership roles in education, and (3) applied professional experiences tailored to individual needs and career goals. Each student works closely with an adviser and a supervisory faculty committee to select courses, topics of research, and professional opportunities.

Preparation in the above areas combine to:

Convey deep scholarly knowledge of education and foster its application in practice;
Promote a broad understanding of various methods of inquiry in education and foster its application in practice settings;
Advocate practices that demonstrate a commitment to diversity in education;
Foster ethical and professional research and practice in education;
Promote excellence in applied professional practice.

The degree of Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) is offered to competent students who wish to pursue a program of study and to participate in appropriate activities in preparation for professional service and leadership in education. The program is designed to meet the needs of those for whom intensive research is not a practical prerequisite to professional goals. Doctoral students are expected to participate not only in organized coursework but also in other activities that will ensure breadth of outlook and technical competence.

Major: EDUCATION

CONCENTRATIONS in the Ed.D. of Education are:

Education, Ed.D., Concentration in Curriculum and Instruction   

Education, Ed.D., Concentration in Educational Leadership  

Education, Ed.D., Concentration in Higher Education Administration  

Education, Ed.D., Concentration in Learning, Design, and Technology  

Education, Ed.D., Concentration in Mathematics Education  

All Doctor of Education students will use research methods to explore practical leadership problems. Applied projects are problem-based and may be collaborative. Projects may involve evaluating curriculum, designing and implementing professional development or training, developing applications to be used in local settings (e.g., early childhood-12 education, corporate and government centers), as well as other projects designed to advance knowledge in a specific field or setting. 

The following requirements apply to all projects:

  • Research-based (literature review)
  • Scholarly, academic writing using APA style
  • Primary or secondary data
  • Authored by individual or small groups of students
  • Uploaded to ProQuest for dissertations of practice or other projects in a dissertation format, and uploaded to the Mountain Scholar Digital Collections for projects in a non-dissertation format

Suggested project formats and brief descriptions are:

Dissertation of Practice

  • A dissertation of practice is original practice-based empirical research with data collection expected from primary sources. 

Local Case Study

  • A case study is a descriptive, exploratory, or explanatory analysis of a person, group, or event.  Thomas (2011, p. 354) offered the following definition of case study: “Case studies are analysis of persons, events, decisions, periods, projects, policies, institutions, or others systems that are studied holistically by one of more methods.”

Faculty Directed Individual or Team-based Inquiry

  • This type of inquiry involves individual or a small group of students working together on a single project under the guidance of a faculty member. Data can be obtained from primary or secondary sources.

Documentary on an Educational Issue

  • A documentary is an in-depth and extensive study with an analysis presented in video form accompanied by a written summary of the purpose and outcome.

Submitted Manuscript

  • A full-length research manuscript must be submitted to a refereed mid- or top-tier national or international scholarly journal.

Program Evaluation

  • A program evaluation report typically uses both qualitative and quantitative research methods to examine and collect data on a current program that is in place in a school or another organization.

Additional project formats may be proposed and approved by the student’s committee as long as they meet the requirements listed above.

Final Project Processes

As in the traditional dissertation process, all students are expected to meet with their committees to gain project approval (at the pre-prospectus and/or prospectus stage). The Report of Final Examination will indicate whether or not the final project is acceptable to the committee. The deadline for submitting projects to Mountain Scholar Digital Collections or dissertations of practice or other projects in a dissertation format to ProQuest is the same as the Report of Final Examination, the last day of classes for the semester during which a student intends to graduate. All projects will be evaluated by committee members and also by the student.

Please note: After submitting the required steps for the Mountain Scholar Digital Collections you will receive a confirmation email. Please forward this email to your chair, Clayleen Rivord in the College of Education Dean’s Office, and Robert Ratterree in the Office of the Registrar.

Ph.D. in Education and Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction

The College of Education Ph.D. program prepares students for careers of scholarly inquiry and teaching in higher education. The program consists of (1) continuous research or inquiry, (2) courses and professional experiences in education and related fields designed to develop a comprehensive academic basis for future work in research and teaching, and (3) teaching and other related experiences tailored to individual needs and career goals. Each student works closely with an adviser and a supervisory faculty committee to select courses, topics of research and inquiry, and teaching experiences.

All coursework in the Ph.D. in Education program addresses the following goals:

To convey deep scholarly knowledge of education and related fields
To promote a broad understanding of various methods of inquiry in education and develop competency in several of those methods
To advocate practices that demonstrate a commitment to diversity in education
To foster ethical and professional research and practice in education
To promote excellence as a college teacher

Effective preparation for the Ph.D. stems from collaborative research and inquiry into topics of mutual interest by students and faculty scholars/researchers. A major portion of the program consists of the individual student and selected faculty members(s) jointly engaged in research and inquiry. Successful Ph.D. applicants tend to have high aptitude for research and inquiry and express interest in general topics which the faculty of the college are actively inquiring and researching.

Major: EDUCATION

CONCENTRATIONS in the Ph.D. in Education are:

Education, Ph.D., Concentration Learning, Design, and Technology  

Major: CURRICULUM and INSTRUCTION, Ph.D
CONCENTRATIONS in the Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction are:

Curriculum and Instruction, Ph.D., Concentration in Curriculum Studies  

Curriculum and Instruction, Ph.D., Concentration in Literacy Education  

Curriculum and Instruction, Ph.D., Concentration in Mathematics Education   

Curriculum and Instruction, Ph.D., Concentration in Science Education  

Counselor Education and Supervision, Ph.D.  

The PhD program in Counselor Education and Supervision is CACREP accredited and prepares professionals for positions as faculty in Counselor Education departments through personalized, developmentally oriented coursework emphasizing the integration of theory and experiential learning. This doctoral program is ideal for self-initiating persons who thrive in an atmosphere supportive of faculty/student interactions, small class environments, intensive class discussions and opportunities for self-direction and scholarly activity. The doctoral program is built upon the basis of a strong Master’s program and upholds the philosopical orientations, coherent principles, and applied knowledge and skills as counselors and supervisors.

The doctoral degree program is 60 credit hours for individuals who have completed a 60-hour CACREP master’s program. Students with a 48-hour CACREP master’s degree are required to complete an additional 12 semester credits. Students, through coursework, practica and faculty guidance, develop competencies in the areas of counseling, supervision, teaching, leadership, advocacy, research and scholarship.

Learner Outcomes

Doctoral Students in the Counselor Education and Supervision will demonstrate the following learner outcomes.

  1. Academic and Professional Goals: Students will demonstrate a clear vision of their professional and academic goals and academic preparation by developing and completing an approved program of study that meets the standards set forth by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP).
  2. Professional Licensure: Students will obtain professional licensure as a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) in the state of Wyoming and/or develop a plan to obtain licensure for the state in which they intend to relocate upon graduation.
  3. Democratic Perspectives: Students will demonstrate development as a culturally competent, creative, skilled & ethical counselor, supervisor and educator including the areas of advocacy, leadership, social justice, and promotion of caring communities.
  4. Research and Scholarship: Students will develop a professional identity as an academic researcher by demonstrating a clear and active research agenda that includes a plan of action for professional presentations and manuscripts.
  5. Professional Development: Students will develop a clear and diligent plan to becoming a skilled, ethically competent counselor educator.

Program Specific Admission Requirements

Applications for the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) program in Curriculum and Instruction with a concentration in Curriculum Studies are reviewed for admission in fall and spring semesters. All applications will be completed through the UW Admissions website: http://www.uwyo.edu/admissions/apply.html.

Applicants are required to submit the following materials:

  • Letter of intent;
  • Recent GRE scores, current within the last five years;
  • Three letters of recommendation;
  • Academic Resume/Curriculum Vitae, including information about teaching experience;
  • Transcripts;
  • TOEFL scores (for international, nonnative English speaking applicants). *Until further notice, due to COVID-19 related postponements/cancellations of TOEFL/IELTS exams, we will be accepting Duolingo scores or 110 or higher as proof of English proficiency.

In order to be considered for admission, applicants must meet the following minimum requirements:

  • Hold a Master’s degree from an accredited institute of higher education.
  • Score of “Proficient” or higher on a letter of intent describing academic goals, teaching experiences, and reasons for pursuing a doctoral degree at the University of Wyoming. This letter serves as a writing sample.
  • Three (3) years of P-12 teaching experience or its equivalent.
  • Minimum 3.000 GPA on a 4.000 scale on the applicant’s most recent degree from an accredited institution, plus transcripts from all other schools attended.
  • GRE minimum score of Verbal:153, Quantitative:144.
  • TOEFL score of 540 (paperbased), 76 (internet exam) or IELTS score of 6.5 or above are required for international, non-native English speaking applicants. Until further notice, due to COVID-19 related postponements/cancellations of TOEFL/IELTS exams, we will be accepting Duolingo scores or 110 or higher as proof of English proficiency.

Please see the Graduate Admissions and Graduate Student Regulations and Policies entries in the front section of the UW Catalog for more information.

Applications for the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) program in Curriculum and Instruction with a concentration in Literacy Education are reviewed for admission in fall and spring semesters. All applications will be completed through the UW Admissions website: http://www.uwyo.edu/admissions/apply.html.

Applicants are required to submit the following materials:

  • Current resume or vita;
  • A detailed letter that expresses why the applicant wishes to pursue a PhD in Literacy Education, including the applicant’s career goals; the applicant’s prior experiences in literacy or literacy education (e.g., relevant teaching or other educational experiences); previous university degrees, programs, certificates, or emphases related to literacy; potential areas of focus in a literacy doctoral program; potential research interests; and any other information the applicant considers to be relevant to her or his admission;
  • Three Letters of Recommendation from those who can speak to the applicant’s intellect, scholarly abilities, teaching ability, or other qualifications for doctoral study. These letters typically would be former professors, supervisors, or administrators;
  • An official report of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) that was taken within the preceding 5 years;
  • An academic writing sample is not required, but is preferred.
  • Transcripts;
  • TOEFL or IELTS score is required for international, non-native English speaking applicants. Until further notice, due to COVID-19 related postponements/cancellations of TOEFL/IELTS exams, we will be accepting Duolingo scores or 110 or higher as proof of English proficiency.

In order to be considered for admission, applicants must meet the following minimum requirements:

  • Minimum 3.000 GPA on a 4.000 scale on the applicant’s bachelor’s from an accredited institution, plus transcripts from all other schools attended.
  • Interview with Literacy Education Program faculty, either in person or via telephone
  • Master’s degree is preferred.
  • GRE minimum score of Verbal:153, Quantitative:144.
  • TOEFL scores of 540 (paper-based test), 76 (internet-based test), 197 (computer based test) or IELTS scores of 6.5 higher are required for international, non-native English speaking applicants. Minimum scores do not guarantee admission. Until further notice, due to COVID-19 related postponements/cancellations of TOEFL/IELTS exams, we will be accepting Duolingo scores or 110 or higher as proof of English proficiency.

Please see the Graduate Admissions and Graduate Student Regulations and Policies entries in the front section of the UW Catalog for more information.

Applications for the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) program in Curriculum and Instruction with a concentration in Mathematics Education are reviewed for admission in fall and spring semesters. All applications will be completed through the UW Admissions website: http://www.uwyo.edu/admissions/apply.html.

Applicants are required to submit the following materials:

  • Writing sample (an article, master’s thesis, or well-done project/course paper);
  • An application letter, which discusses yourself, your experience, and your potential research interests;
  • A resume or curriculum vita;
  • Three letters of reference;
  • Transcripts from all universities attended. Unofficial transcripts can be loaded to the online application system, but if admitted to the University, official transcripts will need to be sent prior to beginning the program
  • Copy of GRE scores
  • International, non-native English speaking students must submit scores for a language proficiency exam, such as TOEFL or IELTS. Until further notice, due to COVID-19 related postponements/cancellations of TOEFL/IELTS exams, we will be accepting Duolingo scores or 110 or higher as proof of English proficiency.

Please see the Graduate Admissions and Graduate Student Regulations and Policies entries in the front section of the UW Catalog for more information.

Applications for the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) program in Curriculum and Instruction with a concentration in Science Education are reviewed for admission in fall and spring semesters. All applications will be completed through the UW Admissions website: http://www.uwyo.edu/admissions/apply.html.

Applicants are required to submit the following materials:

  • Letter of intent. In this letter, describe why you wish to pursue a PhD in Science Education, including your career goals; your prior experiences in science or science education (e.g., relevant teaching or other educational experiences); previous university degrees, programs, certificates, or emphases related to science; potential areas of focus in a science doctoral program; potential research interests; and any other information you consider to be relevant to your admission.
  • GRE scores.
  • Transcripts.
  • TOEFL or IELTS scores (for international, non-native English speaking applicants). Until further notice, due to COVID-19 related postponements/cancellations of TOEFL/IELTS exams, we will be accepting Duolingo scores or 110 or higher as proof of English proficiency.
  • Applicants need to contact a member of the Science Education PhD Program faculty, either in person or via telephone, to discuss career and research goals. This assists us in assigning a graduate advisor upon admission.
  • Recommended: sample of professional writing.

In order to be considered for admission, applicants must meet the following minimum requirements:

  • GRE Scores: The admissions committee will consider the Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning scores in its determination. Effective July 1, 2016 applicants must have GRE scores of 153 Verbal and 144 Quantitative Reasoning or higher to be considered for admission. Minimum scores do not guarantee admission. Other criteria, as well as faculty capacity, will be considered in the admission process.
  • TOEFL scores of 540 (paper-based test), 76 (internet-based test), 197 (computer based test) or IELTS scores of 6.5 higher are required for international, non-native English speaking applicants. Minimum scores do not guarantee admission. Until further notice, due to COVID-19 related postponements/cancellations of TOEFL/IELTS exams, we will be accepting Duolingo scores or 110 or higher as proof of English proficiency.
  • Minimum GPA of 3.000 on bachelor’s degree.

Applicants are evaluated on alignment of research interests with those of existing faculty, clarity of application letter and goals, prior teaching or work experience, letters of recommendation, transcripts (including GPA) and previous research experience with an accompanying sample of professional writing if available, according to the Science Education PhD Admissions Rubric.

Following the application review, the program faculty will make a recommendation regarding admission for Graduate Study at UW. Applicants will be notified of the decision by email. Applications will be considered at any time, but students who apply by January 15 will receive full consideration for graduate assistantships for the following academic year.

Please see the Graduate Admissions and Graduate Student Regulations and Policies entries in the front section of the UW Catalog for more information.

Program Specific Graduate Assistantships

Applicants interested in a Graduate Assistantship must submit a graduate assistantship application at the time of admission application process or communicate with their advisor and school director thereinafter. 

Graduate Certificates

Graduate Certificate programs in Teaching Elementary School (TES) and in Teaching Secondary Content (TSC) with an option to earn a master’s degree in Curriculum and Instruction have been established to provide an alternative licensure route through Wyoming’s Professional Teaching Standards Board for individuals who have already completed a bachelor’s degree. This on-line graduate certificate program does not result in another degree; rather, it is an alternative avenue toward initial Wyoming teacher licensure, with the bonus that it provides up to 12 hours of graduate credit that can be applied to a master’s degree in Curriculum and Instruction. Some programs highly recommend a few intensive weekends completed in Laramie, WY.

Graduate Credit Earned in Post-Baccalaureate Program (12 credit hours)
EDCI 5250 - Advanced Topics in Pedagogy (3)
EDCI 5550 - The Art & Science of Teaching (4)
EDCI 5560 - Seminar in Assessment (1)
EDCI 5990 - Internship (4)

Admission to both the Graduate Certificate in Teaching and the master’s degree programs require separate applications. The actual licensure courses encompass three full-time semesters: one summer and the following fall and spring semesters, which includes student teaching. Previous coursework or a passed content area Praxis exam is required.

The Teaching Elementary School (TES) Graduate Certificate leads to initial teacher licensure in grades K-6. The Teaching Secondary Content (TSC) Graduate Certificate leads to initial teacher licensure in grades 6-12 in each of the following licensure areas: Agriculture, English, Mathematics, Modern Languages (French, German, Spanish), Science (Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Earth System Science, Geology), and Social Studies (History and Political Science).

Programs

    MajorMinorGraduateCertificateEndorsementEndorsement/Certificate

    Courses

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