Jun 24, 2024  
2021-2022 University of Wyoming Catalog 
    
2021-2022 University of Wyoming Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering and Construction Management


3074 Engineering Building, (307) 766‑2390
FAX: (307) 766-2221
Web site:
www.uwyo.edu/civil/
Department Head: Anthony S. Denzer

Professors:

MICHAEL G. BARKER, B.S. Purdue University 1983; M.S. 1987; Ph.D. University of Minnesota 1990; Professor of Civil Engineering 2003.

JONATHAN A. BRANT, B.S. Virginia Military Institute 1998; M.S. University of Nevada 2000; Ph.D. 2003; Professor of Civil Engineering 2020, 2008.

ANTHONY S. DENZER, B.A. University of California, Berkeley 1991; M.Arch. University of Kansas 1998; Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles 2005; Professor of Architectural Engineering, 2021, 2005.

KHALED KSAIBATI, B.S. Wayne State University 1984; M.S. Purdue University 1986; Ph.D. Purdue University 1990; Professor of Civil Engineering 2001; Director of the Wyoming Technology Transfer Center 2003, 1990.

MICHAEL A. URYNOWICZ, B.S. Michigan State University 1990; M.S. University of Wisconsin 1995; M.S. Colorado School of Mines 1998; Ph.D. 2000; Professor of Civil Engineering 2014, 2002.

JIANTING “JULIAN” ZHU, B.S. Zhejiang University 1983; M.S. Peking University 1985; Ph.D. Dalhousie University 1996; Professor of Civil Engineering 2019, 2013.

Associate Professors:

MOHAMED AHMED, B.S. Al-Azhar University 2001; M.S University of Central Florida 2009; Ph.D. 2012; Associate Professor of Civil Engineering, 2019, 2013.

FRANCOIS JACOBS, B.S. California Baptist University 1995; M.B.A. University of Denver 2005; Ph.D. Colorado State University 2010; Associate Professor of Construction Management, 2019.

DAVID J. MUKAI, B.S. University of Hawaii 1983; M.S. 1985; Ph.D. University of Washington 1991; Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 2005, 2001.

KAM NG, B.S. Iowa State University 1996; M.S. 1997; Ph.D. 2011; Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 2019, 2012.

NORIAKI OHARA, B.A. Chuo University 1997; M.A. 1999; Ph.D. University of California, Davis 2003; Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 2019, 2012.

GANG TAN, B.S. Tsinghua University 1998; M.S. 2001; Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology 2005; Associate Professor of Architectural Engineering 2016, 2009.

JENNIFER E. TANNER, B.A. Eastern College 1994; B.S. Oklahoma State University 1995; M.S. University of Costa Rica 1998; Ph.D. University of Texas 2003; Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 2009, 2003.

LIPING WANG, B.S. Xi’an University of Architecture and Technology 2010; M.S. 2003; Ph.D. National University of Singapore 2007; Associate Professor of Architectural Engineering, 2020, 2013.

HAIBO ZHAI, B.S. Xi’an University of Technology 1999; M.S.Tongji University 2002; Ph.D. North Carolina State University, 2008; Associate Professor of Civil Engineering, 2020.

Assistant Professors:

AHMED ABDELATY AHMED,  B.S. Cairo University 2001; M.S. 2014; Ph.D. Iowa State University, 2017; Assistant Professor of Construction Management, 2020.

CHENGYI “CHARLIE” ZHANG, B.S. Harbin University of Commerce 2007; M.S. China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 2009; Ph.D. Illinois Institute of Technology 2013; Assistant Professor of Construction Management, 2020.

MILAN ZLATKOVIC, B.S. University of Belgrade 2005; M.S. University of Utah 2009; Ph.D. 2015; Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering, 2016.

 

Assistant Instructional Professors:

SHAWN C. GRIFFITHS, B.S. Utah State University 2009; M.S. University of Arkansas 2011; Ph.D. University of Texas, Austin 2015; Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering 2015.

Academic Professionals:

KIMBERLY FRITH, B.S. Clemson University, 2007; M.S. Stanford University 2009; Assistant Lecturer, 2020.

JON A. GARDZELEWSKI, B.S. University of Wyoming 2002; M.Arch. University of Oregon 2005; Associate Lecturer, 2016, 2010.

Adjunct Faculty:

Aaron Cvar, Song Jin, Mark Kilgore, Robert Loane, Marci Miller, Alan Moore, Evan O’Toole, Chris Schabron.

Professors Emeriti:

Patricia J.S. Colberg, Charles W. Dolan, Thomas V. Edgar, K. James Fornstrom, Victor R. Hasfurther, Michael Humenick, Anton Munari, Larry O. Pochop, Jay Puckett, Richard J. Schmidt, James L. Smith, John P. Turner, Eugene M. Wilson

Civil Engineering

The mission of the department of Civil and Architectural Engineering and Construction Management at the University of Wyoming is:

  • To educate and prepare Civil & Architectural Engineering and Construction Management students to lead as designers, builders, project managers and entrepreneurs as it relates to the sustainable built and natural environments.
  • To develop technical solutions through research, innovation, and improved infrastructure to diversify and grow the economies that serve Wyoming and the world.

The Civil Engineering curriculum begins with a basic education in the physical, engineering, mathematical and computer sciences. This foundation supports further development of engineering topics that prepare the engineer to address critical societal needs. To meet these needs, the Civil Engineer designs and builds bridges, buildings, dams and hydraulic structures, pipelines and canals, power plants, transportation facilities, sanitary and environmental engineering facilities, surveying and mapping systems, space and ocean platforms, as well as numerous other engineering systems. The civil engineer must also be aware of the social, humanistic, and political aspects of their projects. Therefore, course work in the humanities and social sciences is required to better understand the social aspects of public works. During the last two years of their program, students may pursue several areas of Civil Engineering or, depending upon their interests, more specialized courses in one or more of the specific technical areas listed below. All students must have a comprehensive design experience.

Structural engineering: Analysis and design of structural systems including buildings, bridges, towers and other structures. Structural engineering also includes the study of solid mechanics and advanced structural materials.

Environmental engineering: Analysis, design and development of engineering systems to provide potable water supplies, treat municipal, industrial and hazardous wastes and protect human health and the environment.

Water resource engineering: Planning, analysis and design of hydraulic and hydrologic systems with respect to watersheds, municipalities, irrigation and drainage, and flood control. Conservation and management of groundwater and surface water are emphasized.

Transportation engineering: Planning, analysis and design of highways, traffic engineering and control, traffic safety, and pavement maintenance, design and rehabilitation.

Geotechnical engineering: Design and analysis of foundations, dams, embankments, slope stability and construction practices in soil and rock.

The Civil Engineering curriculum prepares the graduate to engage in professional practice, and upon completion of post-graduate requirements, to obtain registration as a Professional Engineer. It also provides the graduate with an excellent preparation for graduate studies in engineering, business or law.

Civil Engineering degree candidates must meet the academic requirements of the college and in addition must have an average GPA of 2.000 (C) in courses required for the major. Students must complete a minimum of 42 upper division (junior/senior) or graduate-level semester credit hours. Students may have a maximum of 6 credits in courses with a grade of D in upper division CE courses that apply towards their degree program.

Computer Requirement

Many courses in Civil Engineering require students to have a laptop or tablet computer to bring to class, and to be able to download various software program (normally free). See www.uwyo.edu/civil/undergrad/laptop.html for more information.

CE Objectives

Three to six years after graduation, graduates of the University of Wyoming Civil Engineering Program will:

CE-OB1. Be able to successfully practice the profession of Civil Engineering.
CE-OB2. Be prepared and motivated to accept challenging assignments and responsibilities.
CE-OB3. Demonstrate successful professional growth through leadership development and career progression.

CE Outcomes

The Civil Engineering department regularly evaluates the following student skills.

Specifically, every University of Wyoming Civil Engineering graduate shall have:

  1. an ability to identify, formulate, and solve complex engineering problems by applying principles of engineering, science, and mathematics
  2. an ability to apply engineering design to produce solutions that meet specified needs with consideration of public health, safety, and welfare, as well as global, cultural, social, environmental, and economic factors
  3. an ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences
  4. an ability to recognize ethical and professional responsibilities in engineering situations and make informed judgments, which must consider the impact of engineering solutions in global, economic, environmental, and societal contexts
  5. an ability to function effectively on a team whose members together provide leadership, create a collaborative and inclusive environment, establish goals, plan tasks, and meet objectives
  6. an ability to develop and conduct appropriate experimentation, analyze and interpret data, and use engineering judgment to draw conclusions
  7. an ability to acquire and apply new knowledge as needed, using appropriate learning strategies.

Transfer Coursework: The Civil Engineering program accepts transfer course equivalents listed in the Wyoming Transfer Catalog. Other transfer courses will be considered by petition to the Department. The Department has a Policy on Transfer Courses for Continuing Students, which says continuing students should not plan to substitute “core” courses with transfer credits from other institutions, and that transfer credits for continuing students are evaluated on a case-by case basis. For upper-division coursework, no more than two upper division courses may be transferred and applied to the CE degree. CE 4010 and CE 4900 cannot be transferred to UW.

Advanced Civil and Architectural Engineering Standing

All undergraduate students in Civil and Architectural Engineering must fulfill the Gateway Requirement prior to enrolling in any upper-division (3000-5000 level) courses taught in the College of Engineering and Applied Science.

To meet the Civil and Architectural Engineering Gateway Requirement, the student must earn a minimum of 57 Quality Points from any combination of the following seven classes or their equivalent. It is not necessary to complete all seven courses to fulfill the Gateway Requirement.

Gateway Courses

See the advising pages on the Civil and Architectural Engineering website for more information.

Graduate Study

Graduate Programs

An advanced degree in civil and architectural engineering is professionally and economically attractive. Advanced degrees are important for professional civil engineers in many specialized areas of civil engineering. Many consulting firms and industrial design groups require advanced knowledge gained from graduate studies. Engineers in such firms often work at the forefront of their profession. UW alumni are involved in design and construction of major projects worldwide.

An advanced degree is also required for careers in university teaching and research. A university career is highly recommended for those motivated students who are interested in becoming leaders in education and in the development of new concepts, processes and inventions.

The Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering offers programs leading to the degrees of master of science and doctor of philosophy. Areas of study in the M.S. and Ph.D. programs include: environmental engineering, geotechnical engineering, structural engineering, transportation engineering, and water resources engineering. The department also offers a master of science in architectural engineering and a master of science in environmental engineering in cooperation with the Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering. Additional information is available from the department or from the Web page.

Program Specific Admission Requirements

Admission is open to all students holding a bachelor’s degree with at least a 3.000 GPA from an accredited engineering curriculum and a GRE combined minimum score of 298.

Ph.D. applicants are reviewed with regard to stated interests, objectives and the ability of the department to provide a quality experience for the applicant.

International students must achieve a TOEFL score of 550 on the paper-based, a minimum of 76 on the internet-based or a minimum of 6.0 on the IELTS.

Architectural Engineering

Architectural Engineering is a rapidly expanding profession that deals with the myriad aspects of buildings and their design, construction and operation. Architectural Engineers are typically specialists, responsible for the design and integration of such building elements as the structural, plumbing, fire protection, heating and air conditioning, or lighting and electrical systems. The curriculum in architectural engineering is designed to acquaint students with the various aspects of building design and construction and exposes them to a variety of courses dealing with different building materials and systems. The curriculum also includes course work in the humanities and social sciences, both to enrich the student’s academic experience and assist in dealing with and contributing to society. The program leads to a Bachelor of Science in Architectural Engineering, preparing graduates to engage in practice as Professional Engineers upon completion of post-graduate registration requirements. Graduate work with emphasis in Architectural Engineering leading to a Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degree is offered through the Civil and Mechanical Engineering Programs. Additionally, advanced study can also be pursued in allied areas such as architecture, business or other engineering fields.

Students choose an area of emphasis in either structural or mechanical systems and select courses from approved electives, usually beginning their elective sequence in the second semester of their junior year. Consult with the Civil and Architectural Engineering Department for current elective lists.

Architectural Engineering degree candidates must meet the academic requirements of the college and in addition must have an average GPA of 2.000 (C) in courses required for the major. Students must complete a minimum of 42 upper division (junior/senior) or graduate-level semester credit hours.

Students may have a maximum of 6 credits in courses with a grade of D in upper division ARE courses that apply towards their degree program.

Computer Requirement

Many courses in Architectural Engineering require students to have a laptop or tablet computer to bring to class, and to be able to download various software programs (normally free). See www.uwyo.edu/civil/undergrad/laptop.html for more information.

Architectural Engineering Objectives

Three to six years after graduation, graduates of the University of Wyoming Civil Engineering Program will:

ARE-OB1 Be able to successfully practice the profession of Architectural Engineering.
ARE-OB2 Be prepared and motivated to accept challenging assignments and responsibilities.
ARE-OB3 Demonstrate successful professional growth through leadership development and career progression.

ARE Outcomes

The Architectural Engineering department regularly evaluates the following student skills. Specifically, every University of Wyoming Architectural Engineering graduate shall have:

  1. an ability to identify, formulate, and solve complex engineering problems by applying principles of engineering, science, and mathematics
  2. an ability to apply engineering design to produce solutions that meet specified needs with consideration of public health, safety, and welfare, as well as global, cultural, social, environmental, and economic factors
  3. an ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences
  4. an ability to recognize ethical and professional responsibilities in engineering situations and make informed judgments, which must consider the impact of engineering solutions in global, economic, environmental, and societal contexts
  5. an ability to function effectively on a team whose members together provide leadership, create a collaborative and inclusive environment, establish goals, plan tasks, and meet objectives
  6. an ability to develop and conduct appropriate experimentation, analyze and interpret data, and use engineering judgment to draw conclusions
  7. an ability to acquire and apply new knowledge as needed, using appropriate learning strategies

Transfer Coursework: The Architectural Engineering program accepts transfer course equivalents listed in the Wyoming Transfer Catalog. Other transfer courses will be considered by petition to the Department. The Department has a Policy on Transfer Courses for Continuing Students, which says continuing students should not plan to substitute “core” courses with transfer credits from other institutions, and that transfer credits for continuing students are evaluated on a case-by case basis. For upper-division coursework, no more than two upper division courses may be transferred and applied to the ARE degree. ARE 4720 and ARE 4740 cannot be transferred to UW.

Advanced Civil and Architectural Engineering Standing

All undergraduate students in Civil and Architectural Engineering must fulfill the Gateway Requirement prior to enrolling in any upper-division (3000-5000 level) courses taught in the College of Engineering and Applied Science.

To meet the Civil and Architectural Engineering Gateway Requirement, the student must earn a minimum of 57 Quality Points from any combination of the following seven classes or their equivalent. It is not necessary to complete all seven courses to fulfill the Gateway Requirement.

Gateway Courses

See the advising pages on the Civil and Architectural Engineering website for more information

Graduate Study

Graduate Programs

An advanced degree in architectural engineering is professionally and economically attractive. Advanced degrees are important for professional civil engineers in many specialized areas of civil engineering. Many consulting firms and industrial design groups require advanced knowledge gained from graduate studies. Engineers in such firms often work at the forefront of their profession. UW alumni are involved in design and construction of major projects worldwide.

An advanced degree is also required for careers in university teaching and research. A university career is highly recommended for those motivated students who are interested in becoming leaders in education and in the development of new concepts, processes and inventions.

The Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering offers programs leading to the degrees of master of science and Areas of study in the M.S. programs include: building mechanical systems engineering, environmental engineering, geotechnical engineering, structural engineering, and building energy modeling. Additional information is available from the department or from the Web page.

Students choose an area of emphasis in either, building, structural or mechanical systems and select courses from approved electives, usually beginning their elective sequence in the second semester of their junior year. Consult with the Civil and Architectural Engineering Department for current elective lists. Students are required to have a lap top computer.

Architectural engineering degree candidates must meet the academic requirements of the college and in addition must have an average GPA of 2.000 (C) in civil and architectural engineering courses attempted at this university.

Construction Management

Construction Management is a rapidly-growing discipline, that is focused on the planning and oversight required to deliver construction projects on-time and on-budget. Students learn skills such as project management, decision making, budgeting, scheduling, and site logistics including safety planning, surveying, and building information modeling.

The Construction Management curriculum is designed to prepare students for success in a wide variety of career paths available in the construction sector. The curriculum includes course work in construction, business, humanities and social sciences to enrich the student’s academic experience and to assist them in making a positive contribution to society. The program leads to a four-year Bachelor of Science in Construction Management degree.

Construction Management degree candidates must meet the academic requirements of the college and in addition must have an average GPA of 2.000 in courses required for the major.

A grade of C or better is required in all required courses with a CM prefix.

Construction Management Learning Objectives

Upon graduation students shall be able to:

  1. Create written communications appropriate to the construction discipline.
  2. Create oral presentations appropriate to the construction discipline.
  3. Create a construction project safety plan.
  4. Create construction project cost estimates.
  5. Create construction project schedules.
  6. Analyze professional decisions based on ethical principles.
  7. Analyze construction documents for planning and management of construction processes.
  8. Analyze methods, materials, and equipment used to construct projects.
  9. Apply electronic-based technology to manage the construction process.
  10. Apply basic surveying techniques for construction layout and control.
  11. Understand construction management skills as a member of a multi-disciplinary team.
  12. Understand different methods for project delivery and the roles and responsibilities of all constituencies involved in the design and construction process.
  13. Understand construction risk management.
  14. Understand construction accounting and cost control.
  15. Understand construction quality assurance and control.
  16. Understand construction project control processes.
  17. Understand the legal implications of contract, common, and regulatory law to manage a construction project.
  18. Understand the basic principles of sustainable construction.
  19. Understand the basic principles of structural behavior.
  20. Understand the basic principles of mechanical, electrical and piping system.

Programs

    MajorMinorGraduate

    Courses

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