Jan 28, 2023  
2021-2022 University of Wyoming Catalog 
    
2021-2022 University of Wyoming Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

School of Politics, Public Affairs, and International Studies


Return to {$returnto_text} Return to: Colleges and Schools

207-208 Arts and Sciences Building,
(307) 766-6484
Web site:
www.uwyo.edu/sppais
School Head: Stephanie Anderson

SPPAIS Faculty:

Professors:

STEPHANIE B. ANDERSON, B.S.F.S. Georgetown University 1989; M.Sc. The London School of Economics and Political Science 1990; Ph.D. University of Cambridge 1996; Professor of Political Science 2017, 2005.

R. MCGREGGOR CAWLEY, B.A. Kearney State College 1971; M.A. Colorado State University 1974; Ph.D. 1981; Professor of Political Science 1997, 1987.

TEENA J. GABRIELSON, B.A. Macalester College 1992; M.A. University of California - Davis 1997; Ph.D. 2002; Professor of Political Science 2019, 2006.

ANDREW D. GARNER, B.S. Kennesaw State University 2002; Ph.D. University of Mississippi 2007; Professor of Political Science 2014, 2008.

JEAN A. GARRISON, B.A. University of Wyoming 1990; M.A. University of South Carolina 1992; Ph.D. 1996; Professor of Political Science, International Studies 2010, 2001.

JAMES D. KING, B.A. Michigan State University 1974; M.A. Western Michigan University 1977; Ph.D. University of Missouri-Columbia 1983; Professor of Political Science 1999, 1992.

BRENT L. PICKETT, B.A. Wichita State University 1989; M.A. University of Colorado at Boulder 1991; Ph.D. 1995; Professor of Political Science - Casper 2010, 2005.

ROBERT A. SCHUHMANN, B.S. Appalachian State University 1987; M.P.A. 1989; Ph.D. Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University 1995; Professor of Political Science 2013, 1995.

Associate Professors:

NEVIN AIKEN, B.A. University of Western Ontario 2003; M.A. 2004; Ph.D. University of British Columbia 2010; Associate Professor of Political Science and International Studies 2016, 2010.

YI-LING CHEN, B.S. National Taiwan University 1989; M.S. 1992; Ph.D. Rutgers University 2000; Associate Professor of International Studies and Geography 2015, 2010.

NICHOLAS CRANE, B.A. The Ohio State University 2006; M.A. 2008; Ph.D. 2014; Assistant Professor of Geography and International Studies 2016.

ZOE PEARSON, B.A. University of California Los Angeles 2005; M.A. Ohio State University 2010; Ph.D. 2016; Assistant Professor of Geography and International Studies 2016.

JUSTIN T. PICCORELLI, B.A. Loyola Marymount University 2004; M.P.A. Cleveland State University 2009; Ph.D. 2014; Assistant Professor of Public Administration 2015.

THOMAS R. SEITZ, B.S. University of the State of New York 1988; M.A. University of Kent at Canterbury 1989; Ph.D. University of Cambridge 1997; Associate Professor of International Studies 2015, 2009.

Assistant Professors:

JASON B. MCCONNELL, B.S. University of Wyoming 1998, MA 2003, J.D. 2005; Ph.D. Washington State University 2017; Assistant Professor of Political Science 2018.

GABEL C. TAGGART, B.S. Brigham Young University 2010; M.P.P. 2013; Ph.D. Arizona State University 2017; Assistant Professor of Public Administration 2018.

Senior Academic Lecturer:

ANNE ALEXANDER, B.B.A. New Mexico State University, 1991; M.S. 1993; Ph.D. University of Wyoming, 2001; Senior Academic Lecturer, 2019, 2013; Interim Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs 2020.

Associate Lecturer:

RUTH BJÖRKENWALL, B.A. University of California at Berkeley, 1989; M.A. 2004; Associate Lecturer 2018, 2013.

Professors Emeriti:

Winberg Chai, Larry Hubbell, Garth Massey, Margaret M. Murdock, Stephen C. Ropp, Oliver Walter

Associate Professor Emeritus:

Alan E. Schenker

Adjunct Faculty:

(see department section following name for academic credentials)

Tanja Börzel, political science, Freie Universitaet Berlin
Roger Coupal, agriculture and applied economics
Michael Harkin, anthropology
Mark Peterson, management and marketing
Thomas Risse, political science, Freie Universitaet Berlin
Amy Roberts, elementary and early childhood education
Chris Rothfuss, international studies
Mona Schatz, social work
Ed Sherline, philosophy
J.J. Shinker, geography
Lilia Soto, American studies and latina/o studies
Jim Thurman, international studies, political science - Central Wyoming College


International Studies

Undergraduate Learning Outcomes

Goal 1. Students graduating with a BA in international studies will be able to recognize and appreciate the historical, political, social, cultural, and economic dimensions of international processes and issues, integrating these into an interdisciplinary perspective.

Goal 2. Students graduating with a BA in international studies will have the capability to critically read, write about, discuss, and engage in scholarly inquiry related to international processes and issues.

Goal 3. Students graduating with a BA in international studies will have a minimal level of fluency in a second language and are expected to experience a foreign locale in which to use the second language skills.

Goal 4. Students will be made aware of career and post-graduate opportunities suitable for an international studies major.

Graduate Learning Outcomes

All students who graduate with a Master’s degree in international studies will be able to:

  • Engage in independent empirical inquiry that makes an original contribution to the field of study;
  • Think critically and reason logically about a problem and the ways it can be answered;
  • Employ the best recognized methods appropriate to their research;
  • Effectively develop alternative explanations, use theories and concepts to guide the research project, and conduct the work in such a way that disproof is possible; and
  • Present their work intelligently, with both written and oral capability at a level of professional expectations.

They will have a broad understanding of:

  • International affairs;
  • The diversity of national cultures and social structures;
  • Political and economic systems;
  • Major global trends and problems

International Studies Major

Students graduating with a degree in international studies will be able to recognize and appreciate the historical, political, social, cultural, and economic dimensions of international processes and issues, integrating these into an interdisciplinary perspective. uwyo.edu/sppais.

Core Courses

Students take 9 hours of core coursework. INST 2350 (Introduction to Global Studies) and INST 2310 (Introduction to International Relations) provide the theoretical framework for the global and regional tracks. INST 4950 (Capstone) provides the culminating experience for

students completing the B.A. degree in international studies and fulfills the COM3 writing requirement for the University Studies Program.

Area of Focus

Students will complete a minimum of 18 hours of coursework in two specific areas of focus, choosing a global and regional track. Students must complete a minimum of 9 hours in each track.

  Global Tracks - Governance and Conflict Resolution; Economic Systems; Culture and Social Issues; Sustainable Development and the Environment

  Regional Tracks - Africa and the Middle East; Asia, Europe and the Former Soviet Union; Latin America

Global and regional tracks have suggested Gateway courses. Most Gateway courses fulfill University Studies requirements. All INST students are required to take the Regional Gateway course in their chosen region, either: INST 2230 (Introduction to Asian Studies),

INST 2240 (Introduction to African Studies), INST 2250 (Introduction to Latin American Studies), or INST 2280 (Introduction to European Studies)/POLS 2200 (Politics of Europe and the EU). These courses fulfill the COM2 requirement for University Studies Program and counts towards the 9 hours required for the Regional Track.

Foreign Language 

Students must complete a four semester sequence in a single foreign language or show an equivalent level of proficiency. Language courses must be conversational language courses. American Sign Language is not considered a foreign language.

Electives

Students must take 9 hours of elective courses from the international studies curriculum, 6 of which must be upper division. The following Gateway courses can count for the elective requirement: ANTH 1200, ECON 1000, INST 1060 or GEOG 1000, INST/ POLS 1200,

INST 1330.

All required courses for the major must be passed with a grade of C or better. There are numerous special topics courses offered during the academic year and these courses can fulfill the international studies requirements with approval from your adviser. Students are

encouraged to satisfy the USP Q (quantitative reasoning) requirement by taking STAT 2070, Introductory Statistics for Social Sciences.

International Study Abroad and Internship Opportunities

All International Studies majors are strongly encouraged to consider taking part in a semester long study abroad program or a shorter-term faculty-led international fieldwork or study abroad courses taught by UW faculty (typically offered during the Summer and Winter

breaks) as a way to earn course credit towards their International Studies degree. In addition, International Studies majors are also encouraged to consider participating in paid or unpaid international internship opportunities as a way of earning additional academic credit

towards their International Studies degree. For more information on international study abroad exchanges, faculty-led fieldwork courses and internship opportunities, please visit the UW Abroad Office at: uwyo.edu/geo/eda/index.

Global Tracks

9 hours of coursework from a single track. This list is not comprehensive; students are strongly encouraged to review the International Studies Newsletter each semester to see what additional qualifying courses are currently being offered.

 

Sustainable Development and the Environment

Suggested Gateway Courses: ENR 1100, ECON 1010, ECON 1020, GEOG 1000, GEOL 1600, SOC 1000

AGEC 4460 - Agriculture and Economic Development

AGEC 4660 - Community Economic Development

ANTH 4310 - Environmental Anthropology

ECON 4700 - Economic Development

ENR 2000 - Environment and Society

GEOG 3030 - Geography and Development

GEOG 3550 - Natural Hazards and Society

GEOG 4420 - Tourism and Recreation

GEOL 3500 - Global Change: A Geological Perspective

GEOL 3600 - Earth and Mineral Resources

GEOL 3650 - Energy: A Geological Perspective

INST/AGEC 3860 - Econ of World Food/Ag

INST 4060 - NGOs, Development, and Culture

INST/SOC 4110 - Sociology of Development

INST/POLS 4255 - Politics of Developing Nations

INST 4475 - Sustainable Development & Environment

INST 4580 - Gender, Global Change and Development

MKT 4590 - Sustainable Business Practices

POLS 4350 - Sustainable Development and Global Policy

 

Economic Systems

Suggested Gateway Courses: ECON 1000, ECON 1010, ECON 1020. NOTE: Some courses from this curriculum require ECON 3020.

AGEC 4460 - Agriculture and Economic Development

AGEC 4660 - Community Economic Development

AGEC 4880 - International Agricultural Trade, Markets and Policy

BUSN 4540 - Global Business Issues

ECON 4700 - Economic Development

ECON 4720 - International Trade

ECON 4740 - International Finance

FIN 4460 - Multinational Finance

INST/BUSN 2000 - Intro to International Business

INST/GEOG 3050 - Economic Geography

INST/AGEC 3860 - Economics of World Food and Development

INST/SOC 4370 - Global Political Economy

INST/MKT 4540 - International Marketing

INST/ECON 4710 - Comparative Systems

MKT 4590 - Sustainable Business Practices

 

Culture and Social Issues

Suggested Gateway Courses: ANTH 1200, SOC 1000

ANTH 4300 - Anthropology of Religion

ANTH 4350 - Medical Anthropology

ANTH 4380 - Visual Anthropology

ART 4650 - International Study in Art

COJO 3190 - Cross-Cultural Communication

GEOG 4570 - Cultural Geography

HIST 4405 - American Encounters to 1850

HIST 4406 - American Encounters from 1850

INST/SOC 3000 - Social Change

INST/ANTH 3420 - Anthropology of Global Issues

INST/HLSC 4100 - Global Public Health

INST/WMST 4155 - Women, War and Health

INST/WMST 4175 - Gender, Women and Health

INST/WMST 4240 - Global Sex Work and Trafficking

INST/ANTH 4350 - Culture Change

INST 4590 - Women of India

INST 4650 - Women, Gender and Migration

INST/SOWK 4881 - Intl Social Welfare/Social Dev.

ANTH/MUSC 3015 - Introduction to Music of the World’s People

MUSC 4050 - Advanced Studies in World Music

RELI 2225 - History of Christianity

RELI 2255 - Introduction to Judaism

WMST 3500 - Gender and Society

ZOO 4110 - HIV/AIDS

 

Governance and Conflict Resolution

Suggested Gateway Courses: GEOG 1000, POLS 1200, SOC 1000

ANTH 4320 - Political Anthropology

CRMJ 4280 - Comparative Criminal Justice

GEOG 4590 - Geography of Conflicts

INST 3200 - Comparative Political Cultures

INST/WMST 4155 - Women, War, and Health

INST/SOC 4300 - The World System

INST/POLS 4330 - American Foreign Relations

INST/POLS 4340 - International Organizations

INST 4360 - International Peace & Conflict

INST 4375 - Transitional Justice

INST/HIST 4380 - History of Human Rights

INST 4455 - Drug War Geopolitics in the Americas

INST/GEOG 4560 - Global Cities

INST/HIST 4582 - 20th Century Foreign Relations

PHIL 3250 - Global Justice

POLS 3300 - Model United Nations

POLS/GEOG 4013 - Political Geography

POLS 4710 - Emerging Democracies

POLS 4870 - Seminar: International Relations

POLS 4875 - Seminar: Comparative Foreign Policy Analysis

POLS 4890 - Seminar: Comparative Government and Politics

Regional Tracks

9 hours of coursework from a single track. This list is not comprehensive; students are strongly encouraged to review the International Studies Newsletter each semester to see what additional qualifying courses are currently being offered.

 

Africa and the Middle East

Gateway Course for this Concentration: INST 2240, Introduction to African Studies

AAST/INST 2240 - Introduction to African Studies

AAST/ANTH/ART 2730 - African Creativity and Ritual

AAST/HIST 3120 - Africa Since 1800

AAST 3130 - Global Impact of African Cultures

AAST 3670 - African Diaspora

ENGL 2190 - African Literature

HIST/RELI 2320 - History of Islam

HIST 3220 - History of the Modern Middle East

HIST/WMST 4335 - Women and Islam

INST 3400 - Politics and Society of Turkey

INST/AAST 4050 - Dev., Africa, and Culture

POLS 3270 - Government and Politics of the Middle East

RELI 2040 - Religions of the Middle East

RELI 2450 - Traditional African Religion

 

Asia

Note: The Asian Studies minor is different from this concentration.

Gateway Course for this Concentration: INST 2230, Introduction to Asian Studies

HIST 2040 - Imperial China

HIST 2041 - Modern China

HIST 2460 - Traditional Japan

HIST 2461 - Modern Japan

HIST 3400 - Mongol Empire

HIST 4510 - Modern Far East: China, Japan and India

INST 2230 - Introduction to Asian Studies

INST/SOC 3100 - Chinese Society

INST 4200 - China and Globalization

INST 4250 - Economic Development in Asia

INST/SOC 4680 - Shanghai: Past and Present

POLS 4230 - Governments and Politics of Asia

POLS 4240 - Culture, Society, Political Economy in East Asia

RELI 2050 - Religious Landscapes of Asia

RELI 2315 - History of Hinduism

RELI 3340 - Mysticism, Yoga, and Enlightenment in the East

RELI 3344 - Gods, Avatars, Heroes, and Mystics

WMST 4590 - Women of India

 

Europe and the Former Soviet Union

Note: The European Studies minor is different from this concentration.

Gateway Course for this Concentration: INST 2280, Introduction to European Studies, or INST 2200, Politics of Europe and the European Union

FREN 3110 - Contemporary French Civilization

GERM 3006 - 20th Century German Culture

HIST/RELI 2080 - Holocaust

HIST 2240 - History of Russia from 1855

HIST 3110 - Modern Germany

HIST 4170 - Europe in the 19th Century

HIST 4180 - Europe in the 20th Century

HIST 4270 - France: Old Regime and Revolution

HIST 4280 - France Since 1814

HIST 4290 - History of the Soviet Union

HIST 4310 - World War II in Europe

HIST 4315 - Central Europe and the Holocaust

HIST 4320 - Memory and National Identity

HIST 4330 - European Gender and Women’s History

POLS 2200 - Politics of Europe and the European Union

POLS 3220 - Government and Politics of Russia and the FSU

POLS 4220 - European Union

RELI 4150 - Christianity, Jews, and Muslims in Iberia

WMST 4330 - European Gender and Women’s History

 

Latin America

Gateway Course for this Concentration: INST 2250, Introduction to Latin American Studies

AAST 2410 - Survey of AfroCaribbean Cultures

GEOG 4500 - Landscapes of the Americas

HIST 2380 - Latin America Civilization

HIST 4492 - Indian Cultures of Latin America

HIST 4495 - Colonial Mexico

HIST 4496 - History of Mexico

INST 2250 - Introduction to Latin American Studies

INST/POLS 4290 - Inter-American Relations

INST 4445 - Drug War Geopolitics in the Americas

INST 4475 - Politics of Ntl. Resources in Latin America

INST/LTST 4485 - U.S. Latino Diaspora

INST 4490 - Ethical Trade in Latin America

INST 4495 - Indigenous Social Movements of Latin America

INST/LTST 4650 - Women, Gender and Migration

POLS 2290 - Government and Politics of Latin America

POLS 4890 - Populism and Liberal Democracy

 

General Requirements for the International Studies Major

A student must complete 36 hours of course work and 16 hours of foreign language.

Concurrent Major

A concurrent major is a second major pursued alongside the primary major. The majors can be in one or more colleges. One degree is awarded from the college of the primary major. University Studies requirements need only be satisfied once.

Dual Degree
A dual degree is a second degree pursued either in the same college as the first degree or in another college. University Studies requirements need only be satisfied once. Students must meet all the college and major requirements for both majors. Students must complete at least 30 credit hours (minimum 12 upper-division hours) beyond the credit hours required for the degree with the smallest number of credit hours required. An academic advisor for each degree is required.
Second Bachelor’s Degree

Students pursuing a second bachelor’s degree must earn a minimum of 30 additional credit hours from UW, 12 of which must be upper-division. A student must also fulfill all of the college and major requirements, however, University Studies requirements only need to be met once if the first degree is from UW.

Undergraduate Minors

Students can minor in 3 areas by fulfilling one of the following sets of requirements:

International Studies Minor

A minor in international studies requires 12 hours of a single foreign language and 15 hours of international studies curriculum, with a minimum of 9 hours at the 3000-level or above.

 

Asian Studies Minor

The Asian Studies Minor offers students the opportunity to engage in an interdisciplinary program of study of an Asian region or a single country. The program emphasizes a social science approach to the study of Asian history, politics, society, and culture with options to

include foreign language and study abroad components towards completion of the Minor. For the purposes of this minor, Asia is defined first and foremost as a geographic entity to include Western, Northern, Central, South and East Asian areas. Thus, for example,

countries such as modern Turkey and areas such as the ‘Middle East’ can rightly be included in ‘Asia’ alongside areas more traditionally understood as part of Asia such as China and India.

Asian Studies Minor Course Requirements (18 credits)

If your primary major is in the College of Arts and Sciences, at least twelve (12) credit hours must be exclusive to the minor and not counted towards fulfilling major requirements. To count towards the minor, all courses must be completed with a grade of ‘C’ or better.

Gateway Course (3 Credit Hours)

All Asian Studies Minor students must complete one of two required Gateway courses, either INST 2230 - Introduction to Asian Studies (G/COM2) or POLS 3270 - Government and Politics of the Middle East, depending on their primary area of interest within Asia.

 

Asian Studies Area Courses (15 Credit Hours) 

Asian Studies Minor students must complete a minimum of fifteen (15) additional credit hours from the following list of approved Asian Studies Area Courses. A minimum of nine (9) of these credit hours must be taken at the upper-division (3000+) level. In addition to the

approved courses on this list, topics courses, Honors courses, or other special course offerings may count towards fulfilling Asian Studies Area Course requirements based on the approval of the student’s designated minor advisor. Students are strongly encouraged to

review the International Studies Newsletter each semester to see what Asian Studies Area courses are currently being offered.

 

Approved Asian Studies Area Courses

ART 2720 - Introduction to the Art and Culture of Islam

ART 4650 - International Study in Art (Turkey/India)

CHIN 1101 - Taste of China

CHIN 2041 - Contemporary and Traditional Chinese Culture

CHIN 3160 - See Movies, Touch China

ENR 3300 - Environmental Policy, Conservation and Development in India

HIST 2040 - Imperial China HIST 2041 - Modern China

HIST/RELI 2320 - History of Islam

HIST 2460 - Traditional Japan

HIST 2461 - Modern Japan

HIST 2470 - Civilization of India

HIST 3210 - The Islamic World in the Premodern Era

HIST 3220 - History of the Modern Middle East

HIST 3400 - Mongol Empire

HIST/WMST 4335 - Women and Islam

HIST 4520 - Modern Far East: China, Japan and India

INST 2230 - Introduction to Asian Studies

INST/SOC 3100 - Chinese Society

INST 3400 - Politics and Society of Turkey

INST 4200 - China and Globalization

INST 4250 - East Asia Society and Economy

INST 4560 - Global Cities

INST/WMST 4590 - Women of India

INST 4680 - Shanghai: Past and Present

LANG 2150 - History and Culture of Manga

LANG 3105 - Survey of Japanese Literature

LANG 3140 - History and Culture of Anime

LANG 4800 - Japanese Film

POLS 3270 - Government and Politics of the Middle East

POLS 4230 - Governments and Politics of Asia

RELI 2040 - Religions of the Middle East

RELI 2050 - Religious Landscapes of Asia

RELI 2315 - History of NonWestern Religions

RELI/PHIL 3320 - Eastern Thought

RELI 3340 - Mysticism, Yoga, and Enlightenment

RELI 3344 - Gods, Avatars, Heroes, and Mystics

SOC 3050 - Japanese Society

 

Optional Asian Study Abroad Component

Asian Studies Minor students are also strongly encouraged to participate in a relevant study abroad program in the region of Asia to supplement their coursework at UW. Accordingly, up to six (6) hours of relevant study abroad credit may be counted towards fulfillment of

the Asian Studies Area Course requirement on the approval of the student’s designated minor advisor. Optional Asian Foreign Language Component Asian Studies Minor students are also strongly encouraged to learn an Asian foreign language as part of their progression

towards completion of the Minor. Accordingly, up to eight (8) lower-division (1000-2000) credit hours of an Asian foreign language may be counted towards fulfillment of the Asian Studies Area Course requirement. ‘Asian’ languages at UW include Japanese, Chinese and

Arabic. However, Asian Studies Minor, students need not necessarily be limited to the three languages currently taught at UW. On the approval of the student’s designated minor advisor these optional language credit hours may be fulfilled by other Asian language

instruction at UW, other relevant in-country summer intensive programs, or languagefocused study abroad programs.

European Studies Minor

The European Studies Minor offers students the opportunity to engage in an interdisciplinary program of study of a European region or a single country. The program emphasizes a social science approach to the study of modern European history, politics, society, and

culture with options to include foreign language and study abroad components towards completion of the Minor. For the purposes of this minor, Europe is defined first and foremost as a geographic entity running from the Atlantic to the Urals and from Scandinavia to the

Mediterranean and the Caucasus Mountains. Courses that transcend these boundaries should include the study of Europe in a prominent way to count toward the minor.

European Studies Minor Course Requirements (18 credits)

If your primary major is in the College of Arts and Sciences, at least twelve (12) credit hours must be exclusive to the minor and not counted towards fulfilling major requirements. To count towards the minor, all courses must be completed with a grade of ‘C’ or better.

Gateway Course (3 credit hours) 

All European Studies Minor students must complete one of two required Gateway courses, either INST 2280 - Introduction to European Studies (COM2) or POLS 2200 - Politics of Europe and the European Union (COM2).

European Studies Area Courses (15 credit hours)

European Studies Minor students must complete a minimum of fifteen (15) additional credit hours from the following list of approved European Studies Area Courses. A minimum of nine (9) of these credit hours must be taken at the upper-division (3000+) level. In addition

to the approved courses on this list, topics courses, Honors courses, or other special course offerings may count towards fulfilling Area Course requirements based on the approval of the student’s designated minor advisor. Students are strongly encouraged to review the

International Studies Newsletter each semester to see what European Studies Area courses are currently being offered.

 

Approved European Studies Area Courses

A&S 2200 British Life and Culture

FREN 2130 - Contemporary French Culture

FREN 3110 - Contemporary French Civilization

FREN 4085 - Studies in French Culture

GERM 3006 - 20th Century German Life and Civilization

GERM 3150 - German History and Culture

GERM 4265 - Divided Nation: Politics and Culture in Germany 1945 - 1990

GERM 4285 - 20th/21st Century German Film

HIST 2080 - Holocaust

HIST 2240 - History of Russia from 1855

HIST 3110 - Modern Germany

HIST 4170 - Europe: 19th Century

HIST 4180 - Europe: 20th Century

HIST 4190 - Europe: 1930 - Present

HIST 4195 - European Economic History

HIST 4270 - France: Old Regime/Revolution

HIST 4280 - France Since 1814

HIST 4290 - History of the Soviet Union

HIST 4310 - World War II in Europe

HIST 4315 - History, Politics and Memory of the Holocaust in Europe

HIST 4320 - Memory and National Identity in 20th C Europe

HIST/WMST 4330 - European Gender and Women’s History

HIST 4420 - Britain’s Global Empires

INST 2280 - Introduction to European Studies

INST/POLS/SOC 4330 - The World System

INST 4380 - International History of Human Rights

INST 4881 - International Social Welfare and Social Development

POLS 2200 - Politics of Europe and the European Union

POLS 3220 - Government and Politics of Russia and the FSU

POLS 4215 - European Union

RELI 4150 - Christianity, Jews and Muslims in Iberia

SPAN 3220 - Spanish Culture and Civilization

 

Optional European Study Abroad Component

European Studies Minor students are also strongly encouraged to participate in a relevant study abroad program in the region of Europe to supplement their coursework at UW. Accordingly, up to six (6) hours of relevant study abroad credit may be counted towards

fulfillment of the European Studies Area Course requirement on the approval of the student’s designated minor advisor.

Optional European Foreign Language Component

European Studies Minor students are also strongly encouraged to learn an European foreign language (other than English) as part of their progression towards completion of the Minor. Accordingly, up to eight (8) lower division (1000-2000) credit hours of an European

foreign language may be counted towards fulfillment of the European Studies Area Course requirement. ‘European’ languages at UW include French, German, and Spanish. However, European Studies Minor students need not necessarily be limited to the three languages

currently taught at UW. On the approval of the student’s designated minor advisor these optional language credit hours may be fulfilled by other European language instruction at UW, other relevant in-country summer intensive programs, or language-focused study abroad

programs. All required courses for the major must be passed with a grade of C or better. A course cannot simultaneously fulfill more than one major requirement.

Graduate Study

Students take the Plan A (thesis). Students must have a minimum of 26 hours of graded non-thesis coursework and 4 hours of thesis.

Program Specific Admission Requirements

Admission is open to all students holding a bachelor’s degree in any major.  Foreign students, who are non-native English speakers, must pass the Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI).

Program Specific Degree Requirements

Students must meet three requirements: 1) Each student must take INST 5400. 2) Each student must take INST 5200. 3) Each student must demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language, accomplished in the course of the program or from previous experience or 

coursework. Foreign language hours do not count toward the M.A. degree. The program also offers a joint International Studies/Environment and Natural Resources degree. See www.uwyo.edu/sppais for specific degree requirements.

Plan A (thesis)

Students are encouraged to construct, with the adviser’s approval, a program that focuses their own intellectual interests and career plans. To promote that end, students should be prepared to file a plan of study with the graduate adviser during the second semester of

coursework. No later than the second semester in residence, each student shall select a graduate committee to oversee his or her academic work. The committee will be chaired by the student’s major professor and must have at least one member from outside of The

School of Politics, Public Affairs, and International Studies. Students also will prepare a thesis proposal and give a presentation of their preliminary project before the International Studies faculty and complete a thesis prospectus defense with their graduate committee by

the end of their second semester. Students must pass an oral examination at the completion of their program. Normally, examination will center on the thesis, but may also encompass coursework of the candidate.

 

Required Coursework

Advanced Theory Course

  INST 5200 Graduate Proseminar in International Studies

Research Methods Course

  INST 5400 International Social Science Research Methods

 

Graduate Minor in International Studies

A graduate minor in international studies provides students in graduate programs other than international studies with the opportunity to acquire a basic graduate-level familiarity with international relations, global processes and cultural diversity around the world. Students

acquire a foundation in intergovernmental relations and research methodology. Beyond this, students work closely with a graduate director to fashion a program of study appropriate for their interests and post-graduate plans. The minor complements several other graduate

degree programs.

 

Prerequisites for Admission

Declaration of an international studies minor is contingent on admission to a master’s or doctoral degree program. Application is in the form of a letter of interest to the director of the program, including the background, anticipated course of study, and reason for seeking

the minor. An interview with the director is also required. All prerequisites for entering the graduate program in international studies as a major apply to the minor with the exception of proficiency in a second language. Students must be prepared for coursework in

international studies at the graduate level and be willing to take prerequisite courses if necessary.

 

Course and Committee Requirements

Graduate students minoring in international studies must satisfy the requirements of their graduate major and take twelve credits of guided graduate coursework in international studies. With the approval of the department of the graduate major, these twelve hours may also

count toward the major. Students are required to take at least one advanced theory course (INST 5200) and one advanced research methods course. All courses will be determined in consultation with the program director.


Political Science

Political Science is the study of how societies govern themselves and interact with one another. Courses of instruction in the Political Science major are offered in the following subfields: American politics, comparative government, international relations, political philosophy, public law, and public administration. Areas of focus include analysis of government structures and processes, citizens’ influence on government, policy content, philosophical concepts and traditions, political systems of other states, and resolution of conflicts between nations. By developing critical thinking and analytical skills, the major prepares students for effective participation in the political process, successful careers in the public and private sectors, and further study in law, political science, and public administration.

In 1925, the state legislature passed a law requiring the study of the U.S. and Wyoming constitutions by all University of Wyoming students. Political Science 1000 satisfies this requirement, but the requirement can also be satisfied by special examination given periodically by the School of Politics, Public Affairs, and International Studies.

Learning Outcomes

We continuously and actively assess the Political Science undergraduate curriculum to ensure that the following learning outcomes are being met for each of our graduates:

1. Acquisition of a knowledge and understanding of the values, beliefs, and institutions that constitute governing processes;

2. Acquisition of an understanding of the distinctions among the major subfields of the discipline including: American politics and law; international relations; comparative politics; and political theory;

3. Development of a knowledge and understanding of citizens’ roles within governing processes;

4. Acquisition of a knowledge of the theories and analytic skills necessary to evaluate conflicting arguments, assemble and present appropriate evidence, and make reasoned conclusions from the evidence available;

5. The ability to communicate effectively, both orally and in written form.

Undergraduate Major

In addition to the university and college requirements listed elsewhere in this bulletin, a major in political science requires 33 department hours. Students are required to complete the following four introductory courses: POLS 1000; POLS 1200 or POLS 1250; POLS 2310; and POLS 2460 or POLS 3600. Students are also required to take at least one seminar in political science (and its prerequisites); 8 hours of a single foreign language or equivalent credit by examination as determined by the Department of Modern and Classical  Languages; STAT 2050 or STAT 2070; and a minimum of 9 hours of upper division credit in political science. A maximum of 6 hours of internship credit may be applied toward the 33 hours required for the political science major. Only those political science courses in which a grade of C or better has been earned may be used to satisfy departmental requirements.

Most university studies courses and lower division political science courses should be completed prior to the junior year. Additional information about the political science major may be obtained from the School of Politics, Public Affairs, and International Studies:
www.uwyo.edu/sppais.

5 Year B.A./M.A. Program in Political Science

The Political Science 5 Year B.A./M.A. Program offers highly qualified UW students with the opportunity to begin graduate study while they complete their bachelor’s degree (whether B.A. or B.S.) and thereby earn a graduate degree more efficiently. Political science majors with a cumulative major GPA of 3.5 or higher may be invited to apply at the outset of the second semester of the junior year. Interested students will submit an application and 2 letters of recommendation, at least one from a political science faculty to be reviewed, along with unofficial, current UW transcripts, by the M.A. Director and Committee. Upon provisional acceptance into the program in the junior year, students will be required to take the GRE. GRE scores will be considered for full and final acceptance to the M.A. program, which will be made once the student has completed the bachelor’s degree.

Provisional acceptance to the 5 Year B.A./M.A. program in Political Science will allow students to apply up to six credit hours of 5000-level courses toward both the B.A./B.S. and M.A. degree programs. To earn graduatelevel credit, students must achieve at least a 3.000 in the course. By successfully completing up to six credit hours of graduate coursework during their senior year, these students will have demonstrated their ability to do graduate level coursework as undergraduates, easing their transition into the Master’s Program in
Political Science. Interested students may reserve up to six additional credits for graduate study that do not apply to the undergraduate degree by securing appropriate approvals as explained in the Registrar’s “Request to Reserve Coursework for Graduate Credit” prior to taking the coursework. Students will be granted the BA/BS upon completion of the credit hours required for the undergraduate degree in political science. Students must complete the BA/BS before formally entering the MA program. To remain in good standing in the program, students must maintain a cumulative and departmental GPA of 3.200 and earn at least a 3.000 in all 5000-level courses. Failure to meet the GPA requirements places a student on probation for one semester. If the GPA requirement is not met after that semester, the student will be suspended from the program. Students in the program are encouraged to take the Plan B option. Please see the Graduate Study section to find the degree requirements of the M.A. in Political Science.

Undergraduate Minors

The school offers optional undergraduate minors in American politics, international relations and comparative government, public law, and political theory. Eighteen hours are required in each minor, including 9 hours of upper-division courses and one seminar. A maximum of 3 hours of internship credit may be applied towards the 18 hours required for the political science minor. At least 12 credit hours in a minor must be from courses not counted toward the student’s major. Information relating to specific courses fulfilling minor requirements may be obtained from the School of Politics, Public Affairs, and International Studies: www.uwyo.edu/sppais.

American Politics Minor

A minor in American Politics requires POLS 1000 - American and Wyoming Government, either POLS 4850 - Seminar in American Political Institutions or POLS 4840 - Seminar in Public Law, and 12 hours from an approved list of courses, with a minimum of 9 hours at the 3000-level or above.

Approved American Politics Minor courses:

POLS 2000 - Current Issues in American Government
POLS 2070 - Politics of State & Local Government
POLS 2410 - Introduction to Public Administration
POLS 2430 - Parties, Interest Groups, & Elections
POLS 2450 - Politics & Media

POLS 2490 - Topics in ______ (dept. approval required) (Max. 6)
POLS 3100 - Politics and the Judicial Process
POLS 3520 - Voting & Participation in America
POLS 3550 - Political Communication
POLS 3600 - American Political Thought
POLS 4051 - Environmental Politics
POLS 4052 - Federal Land Politics
POLS 4100 - Constitutional Law: Institutional Powers
POLS 4110 - Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties & Civil Rights
POLS 4330 - American Foreign Relations
POLS 4420 - Seminar in Public Administration (Max. 6)
POLS 4430 - U.S. Presidency
POLS 4435 - Presidential Elections
POLS 4520 - Public Opinion
POLS 4530 - U.S. Congress
POLS 4550 - Internship in Government (dept. approval required)(1-6)
POLS 4560 - Washington Semester Program (Max. 6)
POLS 4710 - Topics in ______ (dept. approval required)(Max. 9)
POLS 4720 - Workshop in Practical Politics (Max. 6)
POLS 4840 - Seminar in Public Law (Max. 6)
POLS 4850 - Seminar in American Politics and Institutions (Max. 6)

International Relations and Comparative Politics Minor

A minor in International Relations and Comparative Politics requires POLS 2310 - Introduction to International Relations, either POLS 1200 - Non-Western Political Cultures or POLS 1250 - Introduction to Comparative Politics, either POLS 4870 - Seminar in International Relations or POLS 4890 - Introduction to Comparative Government and Politics, and 9 hours from an approved list of courses, with a minimum of 6 hours at the 3000-level or above.

Approved International Relations and Comparative Politics Minor courses

POLS 2200 - Politics of Europe and the European Union
POLS 2290 - Government & Politics of Latin America
POLS 2490 - Topics in ______ (dept. approval required) (Max. 6)
POLS 3200 - Comparative Political Cultures
POLS 3220 - Government & Politics of Russia and FSU
POLS 3270 - Government & Politics of the Middle East
POLS 3300 - Model United Nations (Max. 6)
POLS 4013 - Political Geography
POLS 4215 - European Union
POLS 4230 - Government & Politics of Asia
POLS 4255 - Politics of Developing Nations
POLS 4260 - Democratization & Regime Change
POLS 4290 - Inter-American Relations
POLS 4330 - American Foreign Relations
POLS 4340 - International Organizations
POLS 4350 - Sustainable Development & Global Policy
POLS 4360 - International Peace & Conflict
POLS 4375 - Transitional Justice
POLS 4445 - Drug War Geopolitics in the Americas
POLS 4475 - Politics of Natural Resources in Latin America
POLS 4600 - Political Violence
POLS 4710 - Topics in ______ (dept. approval required)(Max. 6)
POLS 4870 - Seminar in International Relations (Max. 6)
POLS 4890 - Seminar in Comparative Government and Politics (Max. 6)

Political Theory Minor

A minor in Political Theory offers an opportunity for interdisciplinary study. Required are POLS 2460 - Introduction to Political Theory, POLS 3600 - American Political Thought, POLS 4810 - Seminar in Political Theory, and 9 hours from an approved list of courses in political science and other disciplines, with a minimum of 6 hours at the 3000-level or above.

Approved Political Theory Minor courses

POLS 2330 - Environmental Ethics
POLS 2490 - Topics in ______ (dept. approval required) (Max. 6)
POLS 3050 - Athenian Democracy
POLS 3610 - Classics in Environmental Thought
POLS 3620 - Environmental Justice
POLS 4090 - Anglo-American Jurisprudence
POLS 4160 - Legal Philosophy
POLS 4640 - Political Philosophy: Ancient & Medieval
POLS 4650 - Political Philosophy: Modern
POLS 4660 - Political Philosophy: Contemporary
POLS 4710 - Topics in ______ (dept. approval required) (Max. 6)
PHIL 2200 - Social & Political Philosophy (Max. 6)
SOC 3900 - Social Theory

Public Law Minor

A minor in Public Law offers an opportunity for interdisciplinary study. Required are POLS 4100 - Constitutional Law: Institutional Powers, POLS 4110 - Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties & Rights, POLS 4840 - Seminar in Public Law, and 9 hours from an approved list of courses in political science and other disciplines, with a minimum of 3 hours at the 3000-level or above.

Approved Public Law Minor courses

POLS 2490 - Topics in_____ (dept. approval required) (Max. 6)
POLS 3100 - Politics and the Judicial Process
POLS 4090 - Anglo-American Jurisprudence
POLS 4160 - Legal Philosophy
POLS 4710 - Topics in ______ (dept. approval required) (Max. 6)
AGEC 3400 - Agricultural Law
COJO 4500 - Mass Communication Law
CRMJ 2210 - Criminal Law
CRMJ 3110 - Criminal Courts & Processes
CRMJ 4140 - Criminal Legal Procedure
CRMJ 4350 / SOC 4350 - Sociology of Law
CRMJ 4540 / WMST 4540 - Women, Crime, and Law
CRMJ 4730 / PSYC 4730 - Psychology and Law
HIST 4515 - American Legal History
MGT 1040 - Legal Environment of Business

Teacher Education

The teacher certification program in Secondary Social Studies Education, with a concurrent major in Political Science is available through the College of Education. A minimum 2.500 UW grade point average and a 2.500 grade point average in Political Science and Social Studies content are required to change majors. Further information may be found under the College of Education section in this Catalog.

Major or Minor in Environment and Natural Resources

The Haub School of Environment and Natural Resources (ENR) offers a second major or minor for students interested in interdisciplinary training in the policy, legal, economic, scientific, ethical, and other perspectives associated with ENR challenges. The Haub School uses problem-based learning and interdisciplinary team teaching. Students of all disciplines are welcome to take classes in ENR or add ENR to their degree program. Contact the Haub School at (307) 766-5080, haub.school@uwyo.edu, or www.uwyo.edu/haub.

Graduate Study

The master of arts and the master of public administration are offered by the School of Politics, Public Affairs, and International Studies. The school’s mission is to give graduate students an understanding of the theories and methods necessary for success in (1) research or in post-baccalaureate study in any of the subfields in political science, (2) high school teaching in social science, or (3) careers in policy analysis or public administration in local, state, or federal government, or international governmental, non-profit, or non-governmental organizations. Our graduate students have progressed to senior positions in government, the U.S. Foreign Service, and international organizations; they have pursued rewarding careers in education and the private sector; and they have advanced to Ph.D. programs in political science and related fields.

Program Specific Admission Requirements

Master of Arts in Political Science

Admission is open to all students holding a bachelor’s degree in any major. Applicants must have a minimum 3.0 GPA. Foreign students, who are non-native English speakers, must pass the Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI).

Master of Public Administration (M.P.A.)

Admission is competitive and is open to all students holding a bachelor’s degree in any major. Applicants must have a minimum 3.00 GPA, 2 letters of recommendation, a letter of intent, and a short analytic writing sample. Foreign students, who are non-native English speakers, must also pass the Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI). Only one class, POLS 5000, may be taken prior to full admission into the program with permission of the MPA director.

Program Specific Degree Requirements

Master’s Programs

Master of Arts in Political Science, Plan A (thesis)

At least 30 hours of graduate credit, to include:

POLS 5510. Public Policy and Program Management.
POLS 5680. Research Methods for Political Science.
POLS 5684. Empirical Analysis for Public Administration.
POLS 5810. Seminar in Political Philosophy.
At least 6 additional hours of coursework in political science.
A maximum of 9 hours of coursework in disciplines other than political science.
A minimum of 4 hours thesis research.
A master’s thesis demonstrating independent research, written under the supervision of the major professor.
An oral examination conducted by the graduate committee covering all coursework and the thesis.
No more than 6 hours of grades lower than 3.000 may be counted toward the minimum number of hours required for the degree.
Students must maintain a graduate GPA of 3.000.

Master of Arts in Political Science, Plan B (non-thesis)

At least 30 hours of graduate credit, to include:

POLS 5510. Public Policy and Program Management.

POLS 5680. Research Methods for Political Science.
POLS 5684. Empirical Analysis for Public Administration.
POLS 5810. Seminar in Political Philosophy.
At least 6 additional hours of coursework in political science.
A maximum of 12 hours of coursework in disciplines other than political science.
Plan B paper that reflects the quality but not scope of a master’s thesis, written under the supervision of the major professor.
An oral examination conducted by the graduate committee covering all coursework and the Plan B paper.
No more than 6 hours of grades lower than 3.000 may be counted toward the minimum number of hours required for the degree.
Students must maintain a graduate GPA of 3.000.

Master of Public Administration Plan B (non-thesis)

Thirty-nine hours of graduate credit, to include:

21 hours of core credit,
6 hours of option-core credit,
12 hours of approved elective credit.

Significant administrative experience is required of all M.P.A. graduates. If the M.P.A. student has little or no administrative experience an internship is required and will be included as 3 hours of the required elective credits. Students entering the M.P.A. Program are expected to possess basic computer literacy, and to have access to a computer for such purposes as communicating with professors via e-mail, receiving M.P.A. Program memos, conducting research on the Web, retrieving articles from course documents libraries, working on course projects, and for conducting interactive/electronic class discussion. Students must maintain a graduate GPA of 3.000.

Master of Public Administration/Juris Doctor

See the M.P.A. Director and/or the College of Law for information. Students must be accepted to both programs.

Programs

    MajorMinorGraduate

    Courses

    Page: 1 | 2 | 3

    Return to {$returnto_text} Return to: Colleges and Schools