Dec 03, 2023  
2021-2022 University of Wyoming Catalog 
    
2021-2022 University of Wyoming Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Department of Criminal Justice and Sociology


Return to {$returnto_text} Return to: Colleges and Schools

Criminal Justice

208 Arts and Sciences Building,
(307) 766-2988
Web site:
www.uwyo.edu/cj
Department Head: Eric Wodahl

Professor:

ADRIENNE FRENG, B.A. Black Hills State University 1995; M.A. University of Nebraska 1997; Ph.D. 2001; Professor of Criminal Justice 2007, 2001.

ERIC J. WODAHL, A.A. Eastern Wyoming College 1992; B.A. Chadron State College 1994; M.P.A. University of Wyoming 2003; Ph.D. University of Nebraska at Omaha 2007; Professor of Criminal Justice 2021, 2007.

Associate Professor:

LAUREN McLANE, B.S. Radford University 2002; J.D. Seattle University School of Law 2008; Associate Professor of Law 2021, 2018.

JAMIE SNYDER, B.S. Northern Kentucky University 2005; M.S. University of Cincinnati 2007; Ph.D. 2011; Associate Professor of Crinimal Justice 2021, 2018.

Assistant Professor:

KATELYN GOLLADAY, B.B.A. Pacific Lutheran University 2012; M.S. Arizona State University 2014; Ph.D. 2018; Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice 2018.

KIMBERLY SCHWEITZER, B.S. University of North Dakota 2010; M.S. University of Wyoming 2013; Ph.D. 2016; Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice 2016.

CLAIR WHITE, B.A. Colorado State University 2009; Ph.D. Arizona State University 2015; Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice 2018.

Assistant Lecturer:

DANIEL FETSCO, B.A. University of Wyoming 1995; J.D. University of Denver 1998; M.A. Arizona State University 2013; Assistant Lecturer of Criminal Justice 2017.

Adjunct Professor:

(See Catalog section following name for academic credentials.)

Robert A. Schuhmann, political science

Students majoring in criminal justice will be involved in a critical examination of the sources of criminal behavior and the social and political institutions and processes designed to control criminal behavior. Criminal Justice majors are offered at the University of Wyoming campus in Laramie, as well as through on-line delivery.

We expect that our graduating students will have (1) acquired an accurate knowledge base relating to crime in modern society to include the elements of major crime, the extent of crime, and its distribution in society; (2) will possess a broad historical and contemporary understanding of the institutions that make up our criminal justice system, the interconnectedness of these institutions, and the related issues of diversity and discrimination; (3) will have developed an understanding of the major legal principles that serve as the foundation for criminal law and the processing of individuals through the justice system, as well as the difficult situations and ethical dilemmas they will face in the criminal justice field; (4) will understand and apply basic concepts and theoretical perspectives in criminology and criminal justice; (5) will possess the ability to access, comprehend, and critically examine research and policy relevant to the field of criminal justice and criminology, including understanding basic research methodology.

Undergraduate Major

Students pursuing a B.A. in criminal justice must fulfill university studies and college requirements as listed in this Catalog, satisfy required prerequisites to courses in the major program, and complete a minimum of 40 credit hours in the major. Only courses in which a grade of C or better has been earned may be used to satisfy major requirements.

Foundation Courses:                                                Hrs.

CRMJ 1001 ……………………………………………………………3

CRMJ 2210 ……………………………………………………………3

CRMJ/SOC 2400 ……………………………………………………3

CRMJ 2685 ……………………………………………………………4

CRMJ 3110 ……………………………………………………………3

CRMJ 3350 ……………………………………………………………3

CRMJ 3490 ……………………………………………………………3

CRMJ 4200 ……………………………………………………………3

Crime and Deviance                                                   Hrs.
(2 courses, total 6 hours)          

CRMJ/SOC 3250………………………………………………………3

CRMJ/SOC 3400………………………………………………………3

CRMJ 3500………………………………………………………………3

CRMJ 4151………………………………………………………………3

CRMJ 4260………………………………………………………………3

CRMJ/INST/POLS/SOC 4705…………………………………….3

Criminal Justice Institutions & Processes                 Hrs.
(2 courses, total 6 hours)

CRMJ 4130 ……………………………………………………………….3

CRMJ 4140 ……………………………………………………………….3

CRMJ 4150………………………………………………………………..3

CRMJ 4280 ……………………………………………………………….3

*CRMJ 4750……………………………………………………………….3

CRMJ 4860…………………………………………………………………3

* only three credit hours of CRMJ 4750 can be used to fulfill this category

Supporting Courses
(three credit hour course; or 1 additional course
from Crime & Deviance or Criminal Justice
Institutions & Processes categories):                         Hrs.

CRMJ/POLS 4110 ………………………………………………………3

CRMJ/ANTH 4230 ………………………………………………………3

CRMJ/SOC 4350………………………………………………………..3

CRMJ/PSYC 4370………………………………………………………3

CRMJ/GWST 4540………………………………………………………3

CMRJ/POLS 4600 ……………………………………………………..3

CRMJ/PSYC 4730 ……………………………………………………..3

CRMJ 4750………………………………………………………………..1-12

CRMJ/PSYC 4760 ……………………………………………………..3

CRMJ 4965 ……………………………………………………………….1-6

CRMJ 4975 ……………………………………………………………….1-3

CRMJ 4990 ……………………………………………………………….1-3

In addition to the above required courses, it is required that students take POLS 1000, STAT 2050 or 2070, one lab science, and two semesters of the same foreign language. A grade of C or better must be earned to satisfy these additional requirements. Upper division course work that was completed more than ten years prior to graduation will not meet major requirements.

Pre-Law Concentration

The Department of Criminal Justice offers a Pre-Law Concentration for Criminal Justice majors that consists of courses selected from several departments across the university. These courses were chosen to help prepare students for the challenges of law school and the practice of law. Students electing the Pre-Law Concentration are urged to seek advising early. Along with the 40 hours of criminal justice degree requirements, an additional 27 credit hours (18 of which must be 3000-level courses or above) must be earned for the PreLaw Concentration. All coursework must be completed with a grade of C or better to be counted toward the concentration.

Verbal Comprehension and Expression (min. of 3 hours)

COJO 2095 Persuasive Argumentation

COJO 3010 Business and Professional Communication

COJO 3160 Theory of Language and Society AGEC 4450 Negotiation

HIST 4515 American Legal History

Written Comprehension and Expression (min. of 6 hours)

Any two (2) courses with a USP designation of WC or COM3 may be counted in this area.

Critical Understanding of Human Institutions and Values (min. of 3 hours)

ECON 1020 Principles of Microeconomics

MGT 3110 Business Ethics

PHIL 3120 Ancient Greek Philosophy

PHIL 3250 Global Justice

PHIL/ENGL 3340 Philosophy in Literature (max. 3 hours)

PHIL 3300 Ethical Theory

PHIL 3350 History of Moral Philosophy

PHIL 3500 History of Science

POLS/AMST/ENR/GEOG/REWM 4051 Environmental Politics

COJO/AAST 4260 Rhetoric and Social Justice

Creative and Analytical Thinking (min. of 3 hours)

CW 2050 Introduction to Fiction or CW 2060 Introduction to Nonfiction (max. 3 hours) or

CW 2080 Introduction to Poetry (max. 3 hours)

PHIL 3140 Philosophy of Science

PHIL 3420 Symbolic Logic

PHIL 3510 Introduction to Epistemology

STAT 4015 Regression Analysis

AGEC/ENR 4550 Negotiation Analysis

World Cultures and International Institutions (min. of 3 hours)

INBU/INST 1040 Introduction to International Business

HIST 1320 World History to 1500

HIST 1330 World History since 1500

INST/POLS 2310 Introduction to International Relations

PHIL 3320 Eastern Thought

ANTH/INST 3420 The Anthropology of Global Issues

CRMJ 4280 Comparative Criminal Justice

INST/POLS 4340 International Organizations

INST/SOC 4370 Global Political Economy

Electives (max. 3 courses or 9 hours)

ECON 1000 Global Economic Issues

COJO 1030 Interpersonal Communication

COJO 1040 Intro to Human Communication

MGT 1040 Legal Environment of Business

ANTH 1200 Intro to Cultural Anthropology

CNSL 2200 Intro to Student Leadership

STAT 3050 Statistical Methods - General

POLS 3100 Politics and the Judicial Process

COJO 3190 Cross-Cultural Communication

PHIL 3440 Philosophy of Mind

POLS 4100 Constitutional Law: Institutional Powers

CRMJ/POLS 4110 Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties and Rights

GEOG 4325 Legal Aspects of Planning

ANTH 4340/INST 4350 Culture Change

CNSL 4520 Fundamentals of Counseling

POLS 4840 Seminar in Public Law

Undergraduate Minors

Criminal Justice Minor

A minor in criminal justice requires 18 semester hours in criminal justice. All courses must be completed with a grade of C or better. The required courses are: CRMJ 1001, CRMJ 2210, CRMJ/SOC 2400, CRMJ 3110, CRMJ 3350, and CRMJ 3490.

Interdisciplinary Pre-Law Minor

The minor requires 18 hours to be completed from among the following courses. Of these 18 hours, 12 must be upper division (3000 or 4000 level). In addition, 12 of the 18 hours must be outside the student’s pri-mary major, and none of these courses may be credited toward both the minor and the USP requirement. Complete one course from each of the following categories. All coursework must be completed with a grade of C or better to counted toward the minor.

Language Comprehension & Expression (3 hours)

COJO 1030 Interpersonal Communication

COJO 2095 Persuasive Argumentation

COJO 3010 Business & Professional Communication

COJO 3160 Theory of Language & Society

COJO/ENGL 4061 Rhetorical Theory & Criticism

AGEC 4450 Negotiation

ANTH 4795 Language Change

Written Comprehension & Expression (3 hours)

Any course with a USP designation of C3 may be counted in this area. However, no C3 course may be counted twice toward fulfilling this category and the USP C3 requirement or another category within the prelaw minor.

Critical Understanding of Human Institutions & Values (3 hours)

POLS 2460 Intro to Political Philosophy

MGT 3110 Business Ethics

PHIL 3300 Ethical Theory

PHIL 3350 History of Moral Philosophy

PHIL 3500 History of Science

POLS/AMST/ENR/GEOG/REWM 4051 Environmental Politics

POLS 4090 Anglo-American Jurisprudence

FCSC 4113 Consumer Issues

AAST/COJO 4260 Rhetoric and Social Justice

PHIL 4300 Topics in Ethics

PHIL 4340 Issues in Environmental Ethics

Creative & Analytical Thinking (3 hours)

CW 2050 Intro to Fiction

CW 2060 Intro to Nonfiction

CW 2080 Intro to Poetry

PHIL 2420 Critical Thinking

PHIL 3140 Philosophy of Science

PHIL 3220 Existentialism and Phenomenology

PHIL 3420 Symbolic Logic

PHIL 3440 Philosophy of Mind

PHIL 3510 Intro to Epistemology

CRMJ/ANTH 4230 Forensic Anthropology

PHIL 4420 Advanced Logic

ENR/AGEC 4550 Negotiation Analysis

World Cultures & International Institutions (3 hours)

HIST 1330 World History since 1500

ANTH 2200 World Culture

PHIL 3250 Global Justice

PHIL 3320 Eastern Thought

ANTH/INST 3420 The Anthropology of Global Issues

INST/SOC 3910 Global Sociology

CRMJ 4280 Comparative Criminal Justice

INST/POLS 4340 International Organizations

Law (3 hours)

MGT 1040 Legal Environment of Business

CRMJ 2210 Criminal Law

POLS 3100 Politics and the Judicial Process

CRMJ 3110 Criminal Courts and Processes

NAIS 3300 Federal Indian Law AGEC 3400 Agriculture Law

POLS 4100 Constitutional Law: Institutional Powers

CRMJ/POLS 4110: Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties and Rights

CRMJ 4140 Criminal Legal Procedure

GEOG 4325 Legal Aspects of Planning

MGT 4340 Law for Managers

MGT 4350 Commerical Law

MGT 4360 Business Law for Entrepreneurs

COJO 4500 Mass Communication Law

HIST 4515 American Legal History

CRMJ/GWST 4540 Gender and Crime

AGEC 4710 Natural Resource Law and Policy

CRMJ/PSYC 4730 Psychology and Law

ENR 4750 ENR Law & Policy

POLS 4840 Seminar in Public Law


Graduate Study

A criminal justice concentration within the master of public administration program is offered by the Criminal Justice program.

Program Specific Admission Requirements

Master of Public Administration Plan B (non-thesis)

Students wishing to enroll in the M.P.A. with criminal justice concentration must first be admitted into the M.P.A. program. See M.P.A. program admission requirements for specific details.

Program Specific Degree Requirements

Master of Public Administration Plan B (non-thesis)

The M.P.A. with criminal justice concentration curriculum consists of 39 credits including: core (7), option-core (2) and criminal justice (4) courses. Students may complete the degree within two years fulltime or approximately three-four years parttime. Courses are offered through distance education, which allows students to complete their degree in their community while working full-time.

Required Core Courses

POLS 5000 Survey of Public Administration

POLS 5400 Public Personnel Management

POLS 5410 Administrative Behavior & Theory of Organizations

POLS 5440 Principles & Processes of Government Budgeting

POLS 5510 Public Policy and Program Management

POLS 5684 Empirical Analysis for Public Administration

POLS 5690 Capstone in Public Management

Option-Core Courses

All MPA students are required to choose two courses designated as option core credit, defined as courses relating to more specific focuses on public administration and taught by MPA faculty members.

Criminal Justice Concentration
Courses Required Criminal Justice Concentration Courses

CRMJ 5000 Survey of Criminal Justice

CRMJ 5100 Public Policy and Crime

Elective Criminal Justice Concentration Courses

(students must select two of the following courses)

CRMJ 5151 Crime Causation CRMJ 5280 Comparative Criminal Justice

CRMJ 5500 Internship in Criminal Justice*

CRMJ 5860 Social Inequality, Crime, and Criminal Justice

*Students with little or no administration and/or criminal justice professional experience must enroll in CRMJ 5500 as one of their electives.

Additional Requirements

In addition to graduate coursework, M.P.A. students must complete a series of papers constituting the Plan B project. It is the purpose of POLS 5690, Capstone in Public Management, to be a framework within which students initiate and substantially complete their Plan B projects.

Following the completion of all other requirements, the M.P.A. student is required to pass a comprehensive oral examination covering the information contained within his/her program of study as well as a defense of the Plan B projects. The oral examination is also conducted within the framework of the POLS 5690 Capstone course.

Students entering the M.P.A. Program are expected to possess basic computer literacy, and to have access to a computer for such purposes as communicating with professors via e-mail, receiving M.P.A. Program memos, conducting research on the Web, retrieving articles from course documents libraries, working on course projects, and for conducting interactive/ electronic class discussion.

Students must maintain a graduate GPA of 3.000.

Students must complete the CAPP program in lieu of a program of study.

 

 

Sociology

208 Arts & Sciences, (307) 766-2988
Web site:
www.uwyo.edu/Sociology
Department Head: Eric Wodahl

Professors:

MALCOLM D. HOLMES, B.A. University of Texas at El Paso 1974; M.A. 1976; Ph.D. University of Texas at Austin 1982; Professor of Sociology 1999, 1991.

Assistant Professor:

DANIEL AUERBACH, B.S. St. Lawrence University 2008; M.S. North Carolina State University 2012; Ph.D. University of Utah 2020; Assistant Professor of Sociology 2020.

JENNIFER TABLER, B.A. University of California Los Angeles 2010; M.S. University of Utah 2013; Ph.D. 2016; Assistant Professor of Sociology 2018.

Assistant Professional Lecturer:

KAITLYN ROOT, B.A. Western Washington University 2012; M.A. University of Akron 2017; Ph.D. 2020; Assistant Professional Lecturer 2020.

Professors Emeriti:

David Ashley, Audie Blevins, Gary Hampe, Quee-Young Kim, Richard Machalek

Sociology is the scientific study of group life and the investigation of the social causes and consequences of human behavior. This discipline occupies a central position in the social sciences and covers the full scope of social behaviors from intimate interactions between individuals to relationships among entire societies. Most importantly, sociology invites students to analyze those features of social existence that we are most likely to take for granted. As such, sociological training imparts critical and analytical skills of great value in virtually all aspects of modern life.

Much of the applied knowledge employed in diverse fields such as communications, social work, business management, family life, health care, urban planning, government, education, religion and the administration of justice derives from basic sociological research. Consequently, sociological training provides an excellent background for occupations connected with these fields. In addition, an undergraduate degree in sociology prepares many students for advanced study in law, education, business, public administration, social work, pastoral work, health care and other professions.

The department provides a comprehensive sociology education both for students who elect to terminate their formal education with the B.A. and for those who plan to pursue advanced degrees in sociology or a related social science. Fundamentally, however, the department aspires to prepare students for informed participation in an increasingly complex world.

Undergraduate Major

In addition to University and College requirements, the following are minimum requirements for the undergraduate major in sociology leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree.

Thirty-four credit hours are required to earn a major in sociology. These courses are listed below. This includes 13 hours of required Foundation Courses, 12 hours of Core Courses, and 9 hours of sociology elective courses. Grades of “C” or better must be earned in all 34 hours of coursework in order to be counted toward the major.

Foundation Courses

SOC 1000 …………………………………………..3

SOC/STAT 2070 or STAT 2050 ……………..4

SOC 3180 …………………………………………..3

SOC 4715 …………………………………………..3

Total Foundation Hrs 13

 

Core Courses:

Complete four courses from the following list:

SOC 2350 …………………………………………..3

SOC 3110 …………………………………………..3

SOC 3140 …………………………………………..3

SOC 3200 …………………………………………..3

SOC/CRMJ 3400 …………………………………3

SOC 3500 …………………………………………..3

SOC 3550 …………………………………………..3

SOC 3605 …………………………………………..3

SOC 3640 …………………………………………..3

SOC 3880 …………………………………………..3

SOC/INST 3910 …………………………………..3

SOC/INST 4370 …………………………………..3

Total Core Hrs. 12

 

Elective courses:

Complete 9 additional hours of sociology courses. Electives may be used either to develop additional expertise in an area of interest or to broaden the student’s sociological training.

Undergraduate Minor

The sociology minor requires a total of 18 sociology credits including SOC 1000. At least 9 of these 18 hours must be upper-division sociology credits. Only grades of C or better can be counted toward the minor. Also, students seeking a minor must have 12 credit hours exclusive to the minor and not counted toward their major.

Honors in Sociology

Sociology majors with a 3.200 overall GPA, a 3.500 GPA in sociology courses and one 5000-level sociology course graduate with honors in sociology. The department also nominates students for membership in Alpha Kappa Delta, the international honorary society for sociology. Selection is based on academic excellence.

Programs

    MajorMinorGraduate

    Courses

    Return to {$returnto_text} Return to: Colleges and Schools