Jan 28, 2023  
2021-2022 University of Wyoming Catalog 
    
2021-2022 University of Wyoming Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Department of Ecosystem Science and Management


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2013 Agriculture Building
(307) 766-2263
FAX: (307) 766-6403
Web site: uwyo.edu/esm
Department Head: Scott N. Miller

Professors:

JEFFREY L. BECK, B.S. Brigham Young University 1993; M.S. 1996; Ph.D. University of Idaho 2003; Professor of Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management 2018, 2007.

THIJS KELLENERS, B.S. Wageningen University, The Netherlands 1988; M.S. 1993; Ph.D. 2001. Professor of Soil Science 2018, 2012.

SCOTT N. MILLER, B.S. Brown University 1991; M.S. University of Arizona 1995; Ph.D. 2002; Professor of Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management 2017, 2002.

JAY B. NORTON, B.S. University of Montana 1985; M.S. Iowa State University 1996; Ph.D. University of Montana 2000; Professor of Soil Science 2018, 2012.

VIRGINIA B. PAIGE, B.A. Colorado College 1984; M.S. University of Massachusetts 1992; Ph.D. University of Arizona 2000; Professor Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management 2019, 2004.

SCOTT R. SHAW, B.S. Michigan State University 1977; M.S. University of Maryland 1981; Ph.D. 1984; Professor of Entomology 1998, 1989.

PETER D. STAHL, B.S. Oklahoma State University 1978; M.S. University of Wyoming 1982; Ph.D. 1989; Professor of Restoration Ecology 2009, 2000; Director, Wyoming Reclamation and Restoration Center.

TIMOTHY R. COLLIER, B.S. University of California-Riverside 1987; Ph.D. University of California-Santa Barbara 1994; Associate Professor of Entomology 2008, 2002.

KRISTINA HUFFORD, B.A. University of California-Berkeley 1993; Ph.D. University of Georgia 2001; Associate Professor of Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management 2017, 2010.

MELANIE MURPHY, B.S. University of Idaho 1998; M.S. 2001; Ph.D. Washington State University 2008; Associate Professor of Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management 2017, 2010.

MENGQIANG ZHU, B.E. North China Electric Power University 2002; M.S. Chinese Academy of Sciences 2005; Ph.D. University of Delaware 2010; Associate Professor of Soil and Environmental Biogeochemistry 2019, 2013.

Associate Professors:

TIMOTHY R. COLLIER, B.S. University of California-Riverside 1987; Ph.D. University of California-Santa Barbara 1994; Associate Professor of Entomology 2008, 2002.

KRISTINA HUFFORD, B.A. University of California-Berkeley 1993; Ph.D. University of Georgia 2001; Associate Professor of Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management 2017, 2010.

MELANIE MURPHY, B.S. University of Idaho 1998; M.S. 2001; Ph.D. Washington State University 2008; Associate Professor of Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management 2017, 2010.

J. DEREK SCASTA, B.S Texas A&M University 2004; M.S. 2008; Ph.D. Oklahoma State University 2014; Assistant Professor of Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management 2014.

MENGQIANG ZHU, B.E. North China Electric Power University 2002; M.S. Chinese Academy of Sciences 2005; Ph.D. University of Delaware 2010; Associate Professor of Soil and Environmental Biogeochemistry 2019, 2013.

Assistant Professors:

DAVID CHRISTIANSON, B.S. Montana State University 2003; Ph.D. 2008; Assistant Professor of Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management 2019.

FABIAN NIPPGEN, M.S. Albert-Ludwigs University 2007; Ph.D. Montana State University 2014; Assistant Professor of Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management 2017.

LINDA VAN DIEPEN, B.S. Hogeschool IJselland, Deventer 1999; M.S. Wageningen University 2002; Ph.D. Michigan Technological University 2008; Assistant Professor of Soil Microbiology 2015.

KAREN L. VAUGHAN, B.S. University of Delaware-Newark 2001; M.S. University of Maryland-College Park 2004; Ph.D. University of Idaho-Moscow 2008; Assistant Professor of Pedology 2015.

KEVIN WILCOX, B.S. Central Washington University 2008; Ph.D. Colorado State University 2015; Assistant Professor of Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management 2018.

Academic Professionals:

CRAIG COOK, B.S. University of Utah 1978; Research Scientist, Stable Isotope Facility Manager.

SCOTT SCHELL, B.S. University of Wyoming 1991; M.S. 1994; Senior Extension Entomologist 2005, Associate Research Scientist 2009.

Adjunct Professors:

Justin Derner, Jack Morgan, Brenda Schladweiler, Gerald Schuman, Nancy Shaw, Ramesh Sivanpillai

Professors Emeriti:

Ann Hild, Alexandre Latchininsky, William Laycock, David Legg, Larry Munn, Richard Olson, Katta Reddy, J. Daniel Rodgers, Quentin Skinner, Michael Smith, John A. Tanaka, George Vance, James Waggoner, James Wangberg, Thomas Wesche, Stephen Williams

The Department of Ecosystem Science and Management offers two programs leading to a Bachelor of Science degree. These are Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management and Agroecology (an interdepartmental program offered through the Department of Ecosystem Science and Management and the Department of Plant Sciences). The coursework requirements necessary for obtaining an agroecology degree are described in the Department of Plant Sciences section of this publication. Either degree can also be obtained as an affiliate degree in conjunction with the School of Environment and Natural Resources. Six minor degree programs are offered through the department: Insect Biology, Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management, Soil Science, Agroecology, Forest Resources, and Reclamation and Restoration Ecology. Obtaining a minor to complement a B.S. major degree program provides credentials and knowledge that can expand career opportunities.

The Department of Ecosystem Science and Management offers two programs leading to a Bachelor of Science degree. These are Rangeland Ecology and Watershed M a n a g e me nt a nd A g ro e colog y (a n interdepartmental program offered through the Department of Ecosystem Science and Management and the Department of Plant Sciences). The coursework requirements necessary for obtaining an agroecology degree are described in the Department of Plant Sciences section of this publication. Either degree can also be obtained as an affiliate degree in conjunction with the School of Environment and Natural Resources. Six minor degree programs are offered through the department: Insect Biology, Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management, Soil Science, Agroecology, Forest Resources, and Reclamation and Restoration Ecology. Obtaining a minor to complement a B.S. major degree program provides credentials and knowledge that can expand career opportunities.

The degree programs reflect the department’s diverse expertise in natural resource and agriculture sciences. Students completing degrees offered through the department are well prepared for careers in natural resource management and sustainable agriculture (e.g., range management, watershed management, restoration ecology/reclamation of degraded land, wildlife habitat management, biocontrol/ integrated pest management, soil science and various types of environmental consulting) or other science careers.

Student Learning Outcomes

The goal of the Department of Ecosystem Science and Management is to provide students with a comprehensive knowledge in several different areas in addition to their specific area of study. These expectations ensure that students may take these learned skills and successfully apply them in their post-graduate endeavors. Assessments in all areas are based on knowledge, skills, and attitude.

These areas include:

Oral communication encompasses all the abilities necessary for effective expression and sharing of information, ideas, and feelings in a format including verbal and nonverbal symbols.

Proficiency in written communication will ensure that students will be able to write for different audiences, from expressive writing to technical writing, using a range of sophistication in language.

Professional behavior involves attaining high standards of behavior and appropriate attitudes, not only through acquiring knowledge and experience, but a lifelong commitment to learning and achievement.

Competency in critical thinking and problem solving will enable students to engage in reasonable, reflective thinking focused on deciding what to believe or do.

Computer and information literacy ensures that students will be viewed as trainable and adaptable in a computerized work environment. Proficiency in this area also enables students to effectively access online information, and skillfully make use of it.

The results in these different areas will aid the department in:

Planning instructional strategies to address student strengths and weaknesses;
Evaluating and describing overall student achievement;
Counseling students for academic and career options; and
Evaluating the effectiveness of instructional programs.

Minor in Forest Resources

The primary goal of the Forest Resources minor degree program is to develop a working knowledge of the processes that influence provision of the key products derived from forest lands. Courses taken in fulfillment of a major degree program will also be able to be applied to a minor degree program.

Hrs

Minimum Requirements…………………………. 20

RNEW 2100, SOIL 4150, RNEW 4775, and REWM 4540. Choose one from REWM 3100, REWM 4285, REWM 4700, or GEOG 4020; choose one from GEOG 2550 or REWM 4103; choose one from REWM 2000, ZOO 2450, RNEW 3000, or GEOG 4470.

Minor in Reclamation and Restoration Ecology

This program covers the use of basic and applied ecological concepts to rehabilitate and restore processes and functions to disturbed ecosystems.

Hrs.

Required Courses ……………………………………..14

  LIFE 3400, SOIL 2010, REWM 4200, 4580, RNEW 4990

Planning and Policy (choose one)……………….3

  AGEC 4710, ENR 3000, GEOG 4040, 4750, REWM 4051, 4052, 4900

Below-Ground Processes (choose one) …………………………………….3-4

  CE 4800, 4820, SOIL 4100, 4120, 4140, 4150, 4160 Above-Ground Processes (choose one) …………………………………….2-4

  BOT 4700, 4111, ENTO 4678, 4685, GIST 2100, REWM 4285, 4540, 4700, 4710, 4850, ZOO 4550

Total 22-25


Graduate Study

The Department of Ecosystem Science and Management is an interdisciplinary department made up of five disciplinary areas: entomology, rangeland ecology, soil sciences, agroecology, and watershed management. The department offers the master of science and doctor of philosophy degrees in entomology, rangeland ecology and watershed management, and soil science. A water resources dual major may be obtained in conjunction with each of these master’s degrees. For the rangeland ecology and watershed management degrees, thesis and dissertation problems may be developed in aspects of range ecology, wildlife habitat, reclamation of disturbed lands, watershed management, utilization and improvement of rangelands, and many other facets of range and forest ecology management. For the entomology degrees, thesis and dissertation problems may be developed in many areas of basic and applied aspects of insect ecology. For the soil degrees, thesis and dissertation problems may be developed in many basic and applied aspects of soil science. The degree programs reflect the department’s diverse expertise in natural resource and agriculture sciences. Students completing degrees offered through the department are well prepared for careers in natural resource management and sustainable agriculture (e.g., range management, watershed management, restoration ecology/reclamation of degraded land, wildlife habitat management, biocontrol/integrated pest management, soil science and various types of environmental consulting) or other science careers. A graduate certificate in reclamation and restoration ecology may be obtained after completion of a B.S. degree or in conjunction with an M.S. or Ph.D. degree. At present, no program for graduate degrees in agroecology is offered; however, some courses at the graduate level are available. Responsibility for this program is shared with the Department of Plant Sciences.

Program Specific Admission Requirements

Admission is contingent upon a faculty member being willing to assume responsibility for working with the student as an adviser.

Applicants are encouraged to initiate correspondence with faculty who share similar research interests as part of the process of securing faculty advising commitment.

In special circumstances, and with the faculty adviser’s support, a student may be admitted in a provisional status with continued enrollment dependent upon meeting performance requirements specified at the time of admission.

Program Specific Graduate Assistantship Information

Current graduate assistantship availability, subject of study, and remuneration can be determined by checking: www.uwyo.edu/esm. Prospective students are also encouraged to directly correspond about future opportunities for graduate assistantships with faculty that share similar research interests.

Courses of instruction in the department are offered in agroecology, entomology, rangeland ecology and watershed management, renewable resources, and soil science.

Program Specific Degree Requirements

Master of Science in Entomology

Plan A (thesis)

The master of science degree normally is offered under Plan A which requires at least the university minimum degree requirements and an oral examination.

Plan B (non-thesis)

Requires 30 hours of graduate credit to include 9 hours of required courses, 11 hours of required electives, and 10 hours of other electives.

Plan B project - follows format of Plan A thesis.

A Plan B master of science will be a terminal degree program in the Department of Ecosystem Science and Management. Students completing this option will not qualify for a subsequent Ph.D. program in Department of Ecosystem Science and Management at the University of Wyoming.

Master of Science in Entomology/Water Resources

Please refer to the Water Resources section of this Catalog for degree requirements.

Master of Science in Soil Science

Plan A (thesis)

Plan A requires the university minimum degree requirements and an oral final examination.

Plan B (non-thesis)

Plan B is available and requires 30 hours of graduate coursework. An oral defense of the paper(s) is required.

Master of Science in Soil Science/Water Resources

Please refer to the Water Resources section of this Catalog for degree requirements.

Doctoral Programs

Doctor of Philosophy in Entomology

Candidates must complete the minimum requirements for the doctor of philosophy degree, plus a preliminary examination (written and oral) covering knowledge related to the discipline (taken after most coursework complete) and an oral final examination.

Doctor of Philosophy Program in Hydrolic Science

Water Resources/Environmental Science and Engineering (WRESE) is an Interdisciplinary Ph.D. program that fulfills an important need by organizing a rigorous Ph.D.- level curriculum, with sufficient numbers of relevant, frequently-offered courses to serve the needs of Ph.D. students affiliated with program faculty.

The program’s Ph.D.-level coursework is essential and forward-looking in areas such as aquatic chemistry, transport in natural systems, hydrometorology, land-atmosphere interactions, eco-hydrology, hydrogeology, vadose zone hydrology, hydrologic applications of stable isotopes, limnology, hydrologic modeling, hydological and water quality effects on aquatic organisms, hydroclimatology, hydrologic remote sensing and watershed hydrology.

Doctor of Philosophy in Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management

Candidates must complete the minimum requirements for the doctor of philosophy degree, plus a preliminary examination (written and oral) covering knowledge related to the discipline (taken after most coursework complete) and an oral final examination.

Doctor of Philosophy in Soil Science

Candidates must complete the minimum requirements for the doctor of philosophy degree, plus a preliminary examination (written and oral) covering knowledge related to the discipline (taken after most coursework complete) and an oral final examination.

Doctor of Philosophy in Ecosystem Science and Management/Applied Economics

The course requirements for the PhD program in Ecosystem Science and Management (ESM) with a concentration in Applied Economics are highly flexible to accommodate a wide variety of student backgrounds and interests. Students can major in any PhD program within ESM including Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management (REWM), Soil Science (SOIL), and Entomology (ENTO) following the ESM admission procedures. The student’s graduate committee, with the approval of the Department Heads and College Dean, determine the final program of study. Acknowledging flexibility, each student’s program of study is expected to meet the following minimum requirements:

A minimum of 72 credit hours of coursework. The credit hour requirement can include:

Up to 48 credit hours transferred from approved graduate courses earned while pursuing an M.S. degree (no more than 4 credit hours of thesis);

A minimum of 12 credit hours of approved ESM (REWM, SOIL, ENTO) courses;

A minimum of 18 credit hours of approved AGEC or ECON courses, with at least 12 credit hours at the 5000-level.

At least 42 of the 72 credit hour requirement must be earned in formal coursework.

No more than 12 credit hours of 4000-level courses can count towards the 72 credit hour requirement.

In addition to the degree requirements listed, students pursuing this option will also meet the following general requirements:

Enroll in, and complete, the graduate minor in Applied Economics.

Include co-chairs, one from ESM and one from AGEC, on the graduate committee.

Participate in a meaningful teaching experience to be coordinated by the student’s major professor.

Complete a preliminary examination covering knowledge related to both ESM and AGEC.

Present research results at a formal public seminar.

Complete a final oral examination covering the student’s thesis research administered by the graduate committee.

Graduate Certificate Program

Reclamation/Restoration Ecology Graduate Certificate

The Reclamation/Restoration Ecology (RRE) graduate certificate prepares the student to use basic and applied ecological concepts to reclaim and/or restore processes and functions to disturbed ecosystems. Reclamation and/or restoration of disturbed ecosystems requires an understanding of the edaphic, biotic, hydrologic, geologic, and topographic factors comprising these ecosystems, including the complex interrelationships that support and perpetuate ecosystem function.

The graduate certificate will be granted to students who have completed a B.S. in an appropriate scienceoriented discipline or are currently enrolled in an M.S. or Ph.D. program. The graduate certificate will also be available to professionals working in reclamation/ restoration oriented fields seeking to upgrade their training in reclamation and restoration ecology. Those interested in the graduate certificate will be required to complete the course work listed below as well as write a synopsis paper with a formal presentation advertised as an open forum seminar.

Required Certificate Courses:

Reclamation and restoration ecology courses

  REWM 4200, REWM 5580 …………… 6 hours

Reclamation problems

  SOIL 5565 or REWM 5640…………….. 4 hours

Reclamation process course (choose one)

 BOT 5700, BOT 5730, BOT 5780, PLNT 5070, PLNT 5470, GEOL 5444, GEOL 5570, REWM 5280, REWM 5710, RNEW 5540, SOIL 5100, SOIL/MATH 5110, SOIL 5120, SOIL 5130, SOIL 5140, SOIL 5150, ZOO 5550 ………………………….. 3 hours

Planning/policy courses (choose one)

 ENR 4900, ENR 5900 ……………………. 3 hours

Minimum total credits needed: 16 hours

Courses of instruction in the department are offered in agroecology, entomology, rangeland ecology and watershed management, renewable resources, and soil science.

Environment and Natural Resources Affiliate Degrees

Bachelor of Science degrees in either the Agroecology or the Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management offered through the Ecosystem Science and Management Department may also be obtained as affiliate degrees with the School of Environment and Natural Resources (i.e., the degree titles would be Environment and Natural Resources/Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management or Environment and Natural Resources/Agroecology). The additional coursework requirements necessary for obtaining an affiliate degree are described in the School of Environment and Natural Resources section of this publication.

Entomology Minors Programs

Because of the pervasiveness of insects, the entomology minors programs provide a vital link among the life and environmental sciences at the University of Wyoming. Students will be prepared to serve society not just through the vital industry of agriculture, but through contributions to basic biology, human and animal health, ecosystem management, wildlife conservation and a myriad of other ways.

Minor in Insect Biology

This minor is intended for students who have an interest in insects as organisms, including their basic biology, ecology and evolution. As insects dominate biological diversity, they are essential to most ecological systems, and have unique physiological systems. Students majoring in zoology, botany, molecular biology, biology or similar fields will find the study of these organisms a rewarding and valuable (if not essential) element of the life sciences.

In terms of biological diversity, at least 75 percent of all species are insects, with over 800,000 known species and another 10-50 million yet to be described. Insects are increasingly used as bioindicators of environmental health. Many industries now recognize that insects may be the world’s richest, untapped natural resource, with billions of dollars of unexploited goods and services. Accessing these resources requires trained entomologists. Such training demands an academic setting, such as the University of Wyoming, where collections are maintained, productive faculty are involved in quality research and teaching, the latest methodologies are available and taught, the necessary scientific literature is readily accessible and a curriculum available that allows the student to pursue this field.

Minimum requirements…………………………….13

Choose one from ENTO 1000 or 1001, then choose from ENTO 4678, 4682, 4684, 4686, 4687, and 4884 to meet the minimum 13 credit hour requirement.

Insect Biology/Entomology Graduate Study

The department offers graduate work leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in entomology and an affiliated graduate option in water resources. Department faculty have active programs in insect ecology (biological control, population biology and plant-insect interactions), systematics (taxonomy, phylogeny and evolution) and pest management (biological control, biometrics and sampling, and pest management on humans, livestock, crops and rangeland).


Agroecology Program

Rooms 50/2013 Agriculture Building
(307) 766-3103/766-2263
Departments of Plant Sciences and Ecosystem Science and Management

The Bachelor of Science degree program in agroecology is an interdepartmental major involving the collaborative teaching, advising and research expertise in the Departments of Plant Sciences and Ecosystem Science and Management. An agroecology minor is also available. See the Plant Sciences section under the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources for more information on the Agroecology program.

Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management Major

Rangeland occupies 47% of the Earth’s land area. The 50 million acres of rangeland in Wyoming provide diverse opportunities for the multiple uses of livestock and wildlife grazing, recreation, water production and natural beauty. Students are taught to understand and manage complex rangeland ecosystems.

The rangeland ecology and watershed management curriculum is designed for students choosing to study ecology, utilization and management of rangelands and wildland watersheds and related resources of forestry, recreation, wildlife management, soil science, botany, and zoology. Degrees include Bachelor of Science, Master of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy.

The undergraduate course of study helps students become well prepared for careers in natural resource management (e.g., range management, watershed management, restoration ecology/reclamation of degraded land, wildlife habitat management, ranch management, various types of environmental consulting), or other natural science careers. The curriculum fully meets the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) requirements for Range Conservationist. By appropriate course selection within the elective hours, students will also meet OPM requirements for additional professional work, such as soil conservationist or hydrologist.

Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management Graduate Study

Areas of graduate study leading to a M.S. or Ph.D. in rangeland ecology and watershed management include range ecology, animal nutrition, watershed management, wildlife habitat management, restoration ecology, and reclamation of disturbed lands. A graduate certificate in reclamation and restoration ecology and a graduate option in water resources are offered in affiliation with the rangeland ecology and watershed management graduate degree.

Course Requirements for a Major in Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management (B.S.)

Hrs.

REWM …………………………………….. 37

 2000*, 2400*, 3000*, 3100*, 4100*, 4285*, 4330*, 4530*, 4700*, 4830*, 4850*, 4900*

Resource management…………………………14-15

 SOIL 2010*, SOIL 4120*, AGEC 4700*, and choose one from RNEW 4130*, BOT 4111*, BOT 3150* or GIST 2100*

Physical and Natural World………………………..8 

 LIFE 1010 and CHEM 1000*

Biological sciences………………………………………7

 LIFE 2022* or 2023*, LIFE 3400*

Communication skills…………………………………6

 USP Communication 1 and COJO 2010

Quantitative reasoning ……………………………….7 

 MATH 1400, STAT 2050

Human Culture ………………………………………..6

 Human Culture, ECON 1020

First-Year Seminar………………………………………3

US and WY Government……………………………3

Electives ……………………………….. 28-29

Total 120

*Course must be completed with a C or better.

Minor

A minor in rangeland ecology and watershed management is available for students in other majors interested in increasing their knowledge of the field. The number of hours required is 24. The required courses for the minor are: LIFE 1010 (4 hrs.) and 3400 (3); and REWM 2000 (3), 2400 (4), 4330 (3), 4530 (1) and 6 hrs. selected from other REWM upper-division (3000 or 4000 level) courses.

Minor in Soil Science

This program is designed to enhance soil expertise for students majoring in agricultural, natural resources, and environmental sciences degree programs. Undergraduate students minoring in Soil Science will enhance their job prospects with federal land management or conservation agencies (e.g., Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, Natural Resources Conservation Society), state and federal regulatory agencies (e.g., Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality), mining and oil companies, environmental consulting companies, or scientific research organizations.

Course requirements (15 credit hours) for a Soil Science minor are: SOIL 2010, plus 11 credits of upper-division soil science courses for a total of 15 credits.

Soil Science Graduate Study

The department offers graduate work leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in soil science, an affiliated graduate certificate in reclamation and restoration ecology, and an affiliated graduate option in water resources. Our faculty have active programs in soil-plant fertility and nutrition, soil morphology, genesis and classification, soil and water quality, environmental soil microbiology, soil and environmental chemistry, and soil and water physics.


Interdisciplinary Programs

Water Resources (WARE)

College of Agriculture and Natural Resources

Department of Ecosystem Science and Management

2013 Agriculture Building

Phone: (307) 766-4274

E-mail: snmiller@uwyo.edu

Web Address: www.uwyo.edu/ware/

Program Director: Scott N. Miller

 

Degrees Offered

M.A. or M.S. in (Program Name)/Water Resources

Academic departments across the university cooperate to provide master of arts or master of science degree programs that contain multidisciplinary training in water resources. The master’s degree offered through these affiliations is awarded as a major with each of the sponsoring department’s graduate programs. The water resources interdisciplinary major will be acknowledged on the graduate transcript and thereby certify to potential employers that the candidate has completed an in-depth multidisciplinary course program in the broad area of water resources.

The educational underpinnings of this program include the following: The purpose of the program is to provide multidisciplinary education and to impart a multidisciplinary perspective to candidates. Training is to be consistent with the rigor of professional water resources demands. The interdisciplinary major program is flexible so as to meet the candidates’ individual professional objectives.

Primary responsibility for student guidance and graduate program formulation resides with the sponsoring department and sponsoring major professor. Please refer to latest updated information on the website listed above. Upon acceptance to the program, the sponsoring department must assign a member of the Water Resources Curriculum Committee to the candidate’s graduate committee. The Water Resources Curriculum Committee’s representatives on the candidate’s graduate committee shall aid in formulating deficiency requirements, course program design, academic performance criteria, and research objectives throughout the candidate’s tenure in the program.

Program Specific Admission Requirements

University application and fee; Application fee is valid for three years; Official documentation indicating bachelor’s degree earned (not necessary if UW is the most recent institution attended); Potential candidates are encouraged to apply for admission to this program by contacting the participating department and by specifying at the initiation that they desire admission to the water resources interdisciplinary major. Their credentials will be evaluated by the sponsoring department and the department recommends admission of the individual into the program to the UW Admissions office.

Program Specific Degree Requirements

The academic program of study undertaken by the candidate must be designed to enhance the student’s background and expertise through formal graduate level coursework in the areas of: (1) technical hydrology, (2) natural resources economics and/or law, and (3) water quality. To insure a minimum multidisciplinary character, the course program must contain nine hours of coursework with at least 3 hours from each of the aforementioned areas and at least 6 of those credit hours must be from outside the student’s sponsoring department, along with a 1 credit hour seminar on water resources organized through the Department of Ecosystem Science and Management. Only Plan A master’s degree programs, which require the writing of a thesis in the water resources area, are acceptable for the water resources degree option.

Each student in the water resources interdisciplinary major program will be required to complete this course once during their graduate program. As part of the requirements for the seminar: (a) students will be required to present a seminar on a current water resource issue in Wyoming and to develop an executive summary of their issue to distribute to class participants. Each student is also required to participate in a discussion group following each seminar which stresses the interdisciplinary nature of the issue; (b) during the course of a student’s graduate program, he/she will be required to present one seminar for the seminar series (preferably on some aspect of their thesis research). This presentation does not have to occur during the semester that the student is officially signed up for seminar credit.


Agricultural Economics/ Water Resources

Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics

206 Agriculture Building

Phone: (307) 766-2386

E-mail: ag-econ@uwyo.edu

website: www.uwyo.edu/agecon/

The objective of this program is to provide students with specialized study in water resources and to signify this specialization by the designation of the water resources interdisciplinary major on the transcript.

Coursework and Thesis

Students must complete the 24 credit hour agricultural and applied economics including M.S. core requirements plus 4 thesis hours and 9 credit hours in water resources approved courses. Achieve a cumulative 3.000 GPA in the AGEC M.S. core requirements. The candidate’s graduate committee, nominated by the major professor, the student and the department head determine the final program of study and thesis research topic, which must be in the water resources area. Presentation of research results at a formal public seminar. Completion of an oral examination covering the student’s thesis research administered by the graduate committee.

Oral Exam Requirement

In addition to coursework and a Plan A Thesis, students must pass a final oral examination. The student’s committee may also require a written examination.

Interdisciplinary Component

nine hours (see Water Resources degree requirements)


Botany/Water Resources

Department of Botany

114 Aven Nelson Building

Phone: (307) 766-2380

Web Address: www.uwyo.edu/botany

In addition to the general requirements for admission to the existing master’s program in botany, the master of science in botany/water resources interdisciplinary major requirements will include the following variations:

Coursework and Thesis

16 semester hours are required in botany, plus 9 semester hours in water resources courses. Other courses in mathematics, physics, chemistry, and statistics also may be required as the special program and undergraduate preparation require. Due to the various, potential subspecialities that students might follow in connection with a botany/water resources interdisciplinary major, no particular botany courses are prescribed. An appropriate array of courses for the desired specialty will be determined by agreement between the advisery committee, graduate student adviser, student, and with the approval of the Water Resources Curriculum Committee. For the water resources interdisciplinary major, a Plan A Thesis is required. The student must present his or her research in a seminar before the department, and must pass an oral exam on the thesis research.

Interdisciplinary Component

9 hours (see Water Resources degree requirements)


Civil Engineering/Water Resources

Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering

3074 Engineering Building

Phone: (307) 766-5255

E-mail: ceinfo@uwyo.edu

Web Address:www.uwyo.edu/civil/

The purpose of this program is to broaden the students’ master of science program in the water resource area in civil engineering.

Plan A Thesis Requirement

Only students with a M.S. Plan A thesis option are eligible. The student’s graduate committee will include at least one member of the Water Resources Curriculum Committee.

Coursework and Thesis

Each student must complete a minimum of 28 hours of graduate level coursework and a thesis under Plan A (4 credit hours) to qualify for the master of science in civil engineering/ water resources. The student must obtain at least 18 credit hours of graduate level coursework in engineering, emphasizing a concentration of core courses in a particular area of emphasis in civil engineering. The core course areas of emphasis for this program are hydrologic and hydraulic engineering. The particular set of courses for a given area of emphasis will be designated by the faculty in the water resources area for these areas of emphasis with the approval of the Civil Engineering Graduate Committee.


Entomology/Water Resources

Department of Ecosystem Science and Management

2013 Agriculture Building

Phone: (307) 766-3114

Web Address: www.uwyo.edu/esm

Ecosystem Science and Management E-mail: esm@uwyo.edu

The purpose of this program is to enhance the cross-disciplinary linkage between entomology and water resources, and to provide students an entomology degree program which emphasizes the important issues in water resources. Aquatic insects are increasingly being used as bioindicators of aquatic ecosystem health. This is an area of environmental assessment that is rapidly expanding, as is the job market for scientists with this blend of skills.

Coursework and Thesis

Each student must complete a minimum of 26 credit hours of graduate level coursework and 4 thesis credit hours of ENTO 5960 to qualify for a master of science degree in entomology/water resources. Specific coursework will be determined by the student’s graduate committee; however, each student is required to enhance his/her background and expertise in the water resources area through specialized coursework and a seminar as shown below.

A. ENTO 5678 Aquatic Entomology (3)

B. Interdisciplinary component

9 hours (see Water Resources degree requirements)

Plan A Thesis Requirement

Only Plan A thesis students are eligible for the master of science in entomology/water resources. In addition to coursework and a Plan A thesis, students must pass a final written and oral examination. The student’s graduate committee will include at least one member of the Water Resources Curriculum Committee to help ensure adherence to the master of science in entomology/water resources degree requirements and that research efforts are in the water area.


Geology/Water Resources & Geophysics/Water Resources

Department of Geology and Geophysics

122 S.H. Knight Geology Building

Phone: (307) 766-3386

E-mail: acadcoord.gg@uwyo.edu

Web Address: http://geology.uwyo.edu

The purpose of this program is to formalize and broaden strong department offerings at the master of science level in ground water geology, natural waters geochemistry, mathematical hydrology, and fluvial geomorphology.

Coursework and Thesis

Each student must complete a minimum of 26 hours of graduate level coursework and a Plan A thesis. In addition, the following specific core courses are required for the master of science in geology/water resources and geophysics/water resources degrees.

A. GEOL 5444 Geohydrology……………………3

B. 1 of the following: GEOL 4830 Introduction Quantitative Methods in Geology ……………………………….3

    GEOL 4880 Surfacial Processes …………….3

    GEOL 5050 Introduction to Isotope Geology ……………………………………………3

C. GEOL 5777 Geochemistry of Natural Waters ……………………………………………3

    GEOL 5444 can be used to satisfy the 3 hour technical course requirement or GEOL 5777 can be used to satisfy the 3 hour water quality course requirement.

Admission Requirements

In addition to the department admission requirements, the undergraduate degree program earned by the incoming candidate must meet the minimum undergraduate requirements for the UW geology curriculum in mathematics, physics, and chemistry. The transcript should also demonstrate a strong background in physical geology.

Plan A Thesis Requirement

Only students with a Plan A thesis option are eligible. Students must follow the same program requirements as stated under Geology and Geophysics department section. The student’s graduate committee will include at least one member of the Water Resources Curriculum Committee.

Interdisciplinary Component

9 hours (see Water Resources degree requirements)


Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management/ Water Resources

Department of Ecosystem Science and Management

2013 Agriculture C Building

Phone: (307) 766-3114

E-mail: esm@uwyo.edu

website: www.uwyo.edu/esm

The purpose of this program is to enhance the cross-disciplinary linkage between range and forest management and water resources, and to provide students with a degree program in rangeland ecology and watershed management which emphasizes the important issues in water resources.

Coursework and Thesis

Water Resources requirements*: 10 Statistics: 3

Range Management Seminar (REWM 5620): 1

Other recommended graduate courses or substitution courses with adviser consent: 12 Plan A thesis credit: 4 Minimum: 30

*Water Resources Requirements Interdisciplinary component

  9 hours (see Water Resources degree requirements)

REWM 5250.

Seminar in Water Resources (1)


Soil Science/Water Resources

Department of Ecosystem Science and Management

2013 Agriculture C Building

Phone: (307) 766-3114

E-mail: esm@uwyo.edu

Web Address: www.uwyo.edu/esm

The purpose of this program is to enhance the cross-disciplinary linkage between soil science and water resources, and to provide students a soil science degree program which emphasizes the important issues in water resources.

Coursework and Thesis

Each student must complete a minimum of 26 credit hours of graduate level coursework and 4 thesis credit hours of SOIL 5960 to qualify for a master of science degree in soil science/water resources. Specific coursework will be determined by the student’s graduate committee; however, each student is required to enhance his/her background and expertise in the water resources area through specialized coursework and a seminar as shown below.

A. Core courses - Students must take or have taken equivalent courses in the four soils disciplines: physics, pedology, chemistry, and microbiology.

    SOIL 5100 Soil Physics (4)

    SOIL 5120 Genesis, Morphology and Classification of Soils (3)

    SOIL 5130 Chemistry of the Soil Environment (3)

    SOIL 5140 Soil Microbiology (4)

B. Enhancement courses - Students must take at least one of the following courses:

    SOIL 5110 Modeling Flow Transport in Soil and Groundwater Systems

    SOIL 5150 Forest and Range Soils

    SOIL 5160 Soil Fertility and Fertilizers

    SOIL 5170 Analytical Methods for Ecosystems Research

C. Interdisciplinary component 9 hours (see Water Resources degree requirements)

D. REWM 5250 Sem in Water Resources ….1

E. SOIL 5720. Graduate Seminar in Soil Science ……………………………………………1

Plan A Thesis Requirement

Only Plan A thesis students are eligible for the master of science in soil science/water resources. In addition to coursework and a Plan A thesis, students must pass a final oral examination. The student’s graduate committee will include at least one member of the Water Resources Curriculum Committee to help ensure adherence to the master of science in soil science/water resources degree requirements and that research efforts are in the water area.


Zoology and Physiology/ Water Resources

Department of Zoology and Physiology 114 Aven Nelson

Phone: (307) 766-4207

E-mail: zprequest@uwyo.edu

Web Address: www.uwyo.edu/zoology

The purpose of this program is to broaden the master of science program in the water resources area by having students take 10 semester hours of coursework associated with water resources.

Coursework and Thesis

Each student must complete a minimum of 26 hours of graduate level coursework and 4 hours of Plan A thesis credit to qualify for the master of science in zoology and physiology/ water resources. Specific coursework requirements will be determined by the student’s graduate committee. The student must obtain at least 10 credit hours as indicated. Depending upon the student’s undergraduate background and career interests, the graduate committee may require that these 10 credits be part of, or in addition to, the 26 credit hours required for a master of science in zoology and physiology.

Interdisciplinary Component

9 hours (see Water Resources degree requirements)


The Willard C. and Elaine N. Rhoads Scholarship for Graduate Students in Water Resources at the University of Wyoming

The Willard C. and Elaine N. Rhoads Scholarship for Graduate Studies in Water Resources was established to honor Willard Rhoads, a member of the Research Review and Priorities Committee for the Wyoming Water Resources Center and a long-time member of the Wyoming Water Development Commission. Funds for the Rhoads Scholarship were donated to the University of Wyoming by Mrs. Rhoads and her family and friends, with some matching funds provided by the university. Two annual awards for the academic year will be made in the amount of $1,000 to a master’s degree candidates for use in furthering research on Wyoming’s water resources.

Eligibility Requirements and Evaluation Procedures

The applicant must be accepted into the interdisciplinary water resources major program administered by the student’s academic department.

The applicant must agree to take a minimum of 9 credit hours (including thesis credits) in each of the two semesters for which the award applies.

Applicants for the scholarship can apply more than once, with the exception of past recipients.

The recipient will be chosen by a selection committee appointed by the Water Resources Curriculum Committee.

Applicants meeting the eligibility requirements above will be judged on the basis of promise of academic excellence as evident in grades for graduate level courses, and a recommendation from the student’s graduate adviser.

Funds for the academic year will be dispersed to the recipient equally in the fall and spring semesters for half of the total amount.

Application Guidelines

Applicants meeting the above requirements should submit the following:

Application deadline is April 1.

A letter from the applicant listing the name of the scholarship for which he/she is applying, which includes a statement that the applicant agrees to enroll for a minimum of nine hours of graduate level courses (including thesis credits) in each of the two semesters for which the award applies, and a statement of academic and career goals related to water research. The applicant must also state the purpose for which the scholarship funds will be used.

An official transcript of grades for graduate level courses earned at the University of Wyoming or other institutions.

A note from the academic department, verifying that the applicant has been accepted into a water resources interdisciplinary major program.

A confidential letter of recommendation from the applicant’s graduate adviser addressing the applicant’s promise for attaining academic and career goals through his/her research in water resources. Up to two additional letters of recommendation can be provided at the applicant’s discretion.

The applicant should arrange for all materials to be sent to:

Scott Miller, Chair, Roads Scholarship Committee
Department of Ecosystem Science and Management
Dept. 3354, 1000 E. University Ave.
Laramie, WY 82071-3354

Programs

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